Fadó Fadó: More Tales of Lesser-Known Irish History

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Troubador Publishing Ltd, Apr 28, 2015 - History - 272 pages
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 A long, long time ago…


Fadó Fadó: More Tales of Lesser Known Irish History is the sequel to Fadó: Tales of Lesser Known Irish History (Matador, 2013). It reveals more episodes from Irish history throughout the ages. 

The Irish abroad are not neglected in this collection of tales, many of which are not widely known or have been long forgotten about. The author makes no attempt to heroise or demonise the figures, though some of the characters do not deserve the obscurity to which the passage of time has condemned them, while others are probably best forgotten. Their stories illustrate the rich tapestry that forms Irish history… 

Who was the walking gallows of Wicklow? What was it about a cave in Donegal that attracted visitors from all over Europe? What happened to the priest who evoked the ire of the Irish government? How did an Irish civil servant defy the Nazis at a time when appeasement was popular? Whose corpse in Galway created wonder and fear? Why did a Monaghan man eat his fellow convicts? And how did a Dublin woman try to assassinate Mussolini? 

Laid out in chapters long enough to cover what is important and still retain the reader’s interest, this book can be started from anywhere. Just like its prequel, Fadó Fadó is a must-have book for anyone interested in Irish history.
 

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Contents

Saint Gall
8
Iníon Dubh
21
Galloping Hogan
37
Hepenstall
51
Alejandro OReilly
64
John Bodkins Hand
78
Albert Cashier
91
Carrowntryla House
103
Michael OLeary VC
132
Grace Gifford
148
Darrell Figgis
161
Patrick Breslin
176
Kurt Mollenhauer
191
Niemba
206
About the Author
219
Copyright

The Limerick Boycott
118

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About the author (2015)

Rónán Gearóid Ó Domhnaill (pronounced row-nawn gar-od o-doe-nil) was born in Dublin in 1977 and raised in Galway. He studied philosophy, history, Irish and German at Galway, Dresden and Vienna. Rónán has had a life-long interest in Irish history, instilled in him by his father and a deep interest in Irish folklore which has led to several articles published in Ireland's Own. He currently works as a secondary school teacher and tour guide in Dublin, where he lives with his partner and two children.

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