A guide manual to the Mammoth Cave of Kentucky

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printed by Bradley & Gilbert, 1860 - History - 63 pages
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Page 15 - ... third as when the animal is in the ordinary condition. It is not an uncommon occurrence for a person in delicate health, or a child, fed on a milk diet, although the milk be from one cow, and the greatest possible care taken of it, to have a bad day or a feverish night, for which no reason can be assigned, bnt which may be traced to such a cause as this.
Page 26 - There are avenues one and a half and even two miles in length, some of which are incrusted with beautiful formations and present the appearance of enchanted palace halls.
Page 23 - The appearance of those who came out after two or three months' residence in the cave is described as frightful. " Their faces," says one who saw them, " were entirely bloodless, eyes sunken, and pupils dilated to such a degree that the iris ceased to be visible ; so that, no matter what the original color of the eye might have been, it appeared entirely black.
Page 14 - ... decomposition. And for the same reason, no matter what state of division the disintegrated rock may attain, dust never rises. In portions of the Cave remote from the localities in which the bats hybernate, no organic matter can be recognized by the most delicate tests. Not a trace of ozone can be detected by the most sensitive re-agents. From what has been stated, it will be observed that the atmosphere of the Mammoth Cave is freer from those substances which are calculated to exert a depressing...
Page 14 - ... stated, it will be observed that the atmosphere of the Mammoth Cave is freer from those substances which are calculated to exert a depressing and septic influence on the animal economy than that of any other locality of the globe. This great difference is observed by every one on leaving the Cave, after having remained in it for a number of hours. In such instances, the impurity of the external air is almost insufferably offensive to the sense of smell, and the romance of a " pure country air,
Page 15 - ... have been known to effect a cure in chronic dysentery and diarrhoea, where all other measures had failed. In all those diseases where absolute silence, and the total exclusion of light are indicated, the cave above all other places, possesses preeminent advantages; for no where else have we those conditions combined. The only condition in which risk is incurred is during the menstrual period. Serious, and even fatal, results have been the consequence of inattention to this fact. The temperature...
Page 14 - The amount of the vapor of water varies. Thus, in those avenues at a great distance from the rivers, upon the walls and floors of which there is a deposit of nitrate of lime, the air is almost entirely destitute of moisture, from the hygroscopic properties of that salt, and animal matter mummifies instead of suffering putrefactive decomposition. And for the same reason, no matter what state of division the disintegrated rock may attain, dust never rises. In portions of the Cave remote from the localities...
Page 15 - ... period of five months. Short trips are attended with advantage, but a cave residence is speedily fatal. I know of no inflammatory disease that is rendered worse by a resort to the Mammoth Cave. On the contrary, short and easy trips have been known to effect a cure in chronic dysentery and diarrhoea, where all other measures had failed. In all those diseases where absolute silence, and the total exclusion of light are indicated, the cave above all other places, possesses preeminent advantages;...
Page 17 - When water holding bicarbonate of lime in solution drops slowly from the ceiling, by which it is exposed to the air sufficiently long to allow the escape of one equivalent of carbonic acid gas, the lime is deposited in the form of monocarbonate. If the deposit occurs in such a manner that the accumulation takes place from above, downward, in the form of an icicle, it constitutes what is termed a stalactite; but if it forms on the floor of a cave and accumulates from below, upward, it is known as...

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