The Miscellaneous Works of Oliver Goldsmith, M.B.: With Memoirs of His Life and Writings : Enriched with an Elegant Portrait of the Author

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R. Chapman, 1816

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Contents

The Chinese philosophers son made a slave in Persia
67
The venders of quack medicines and nostrums ridi
73
The character of the man in black with some instances
80
On the great numbers of old maids and bachelors
90
The proceedings of the club of authors
96
The perfection of the Chinese in the art of gardening
102
The manner of writing among the Chinese
109
The philosophers son describes a lady his fellow
118
Letter Page
120
The Chinese philosopher praises the justice of
128
The English still have poets though not versifiers
136
An apostrophe on the supposed death of Voltaire
145
The ardour of the people of London in running after
153
Misery best relieved by dissipation
162
The fairy tale continued
168
A booksellers visit to the Chinese
175
The absurd taste for obscene and pert novels such
183
Letter Page LVI The difficulty of rising in literary reputation without intrigue or riches
197
A visitation dinner described
200
The Chinese philosophers son escapes with the beau tiful captive from slavery
204
The history of the beautiful captive
207
Proper lessons to a youth entering the world with fa bles suited to the occasion
212
An authentic history of Catharina Alexowna wife of Peter the Great
219
The rise or the decline of literature not dependent on man but resulting from the vicissitudes of nature
221
The Great exchange happiness for show Their folly in this respect of use to society
224
The history of a philosophic cobbler
226
The difference between love and gratitude
229
The folly of attempting to learn wisdom by being recluse
234
Quacks ridiculed Some particularly mentioned
237
The fear of mad dogs ridiculed
241
Fortune proved not to be blind The story of the avaricious miller
245
The preparations of both theatres for a winter cam paign
276
The evil tendency of increasing penal laws or en forcing even those already in being with rigour
279
The ladies trains ridiculed
283
Letter Page
286
His character continued with that of his wife
299
The races of Newmarket ridiculed The descrip
302
The English subject to the spleen
315
The father consoles him upon this occasion
329
A life of independence praised
346
Letter Page CII The Chinese philosopher begins to think of quitting England
352
The arts some make use of to appear learned
354
The intended coronation described
356
Funeral elegies written upon the Great ridiculed А specimen of one
361
The English too fond of believing every report without examination A story of an incendiary to this pur pose
363
The utility and entertainment which might result from a journey into the east
366
The Chinese philosopher attempts to find out famous men
370
Some projects for introducing Asiatic employments into the courts of England
373
On the different sects in England particularly Metho dism
377
An election described
380
A literary contest of great importance in which both sides fight by epigram
383
Against the marriage act A fable
388
On the danger of having too high an opinion of hu man nature
392
Whether love be a natural or fictitious passion
395
Some thoughts on the present situation of affairs in
396
A city nightpiece
399
On the meanness of the Dutch at the court of Japan
401
On the distresses of the poor exemplified in the life of a private sentinel
404
On the absurdity of some late English titles
409
The irresolution of the English accounted for
412
The manner of travellers in their usual relations ridiculed
414
The conclusion
418

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Page 288 - A man of letters at present whose works are valuable is perfectly sensible of their value. Every polite member of the community, by buying what he writes, contributes to reward him. The ridicule therefore of living in a garret might have been wit in the last age, but continues such no longer, because no longer true. A writer of real merit now may easily be rich if his heart be set only on fortune : and for those who have no merit it is but fit that such should remain in merited obscurity.
Page 3 - ... from the oracle of some coffeehouse, which oracle has himself gathered them the night before from a beau at a gaming-table, who has pillaged his knowledge from a great man's porter, who has had his information from the great man's gentleman, who has invented the whole story for his own amusement the night preceding.
Page 392 - ... their misery. But who are those who make the streets their couch, and find a short repose from wretchedness at the doors of the opulent ? These are strangers, wanderers, and orphans, whose circumstances are too humble to expect redress, and whose distresses are too great even for pity.
Page 209 - ... was heir to no other inheritance than the virtues and frugality of her parents. Her father being dead, she lived with her aged mother in their cottage covered with straw ; and both, though very poor, were very contented.
Page 274 - I promised," replied the emperor with a generous air, " to destroy my enemies ; I have fulfilled my word, for see they are enemies no longer ; I have made friends of them.
Page 75 - A wretch, who in the deepest distress still aimed at good-humour, was an object my friend was by no means capable of withstanding : his vivacity and his discourse were instantly interrupted ; upon this occasion his very dissimulation had forsaken him. Even in my presence he immediately applied his hands to his pockets, in order to relieve her ; but guess his confusion when he found he had already given away all the money he carried about him to former objects.
Page 76 - ... and that was laughed at; he repeated the jest of the two scholars and one pair of breeches, and the company laughed at that ; but the story of Taffy in...
Page 398 - I believe the devil put it in my head to fling my stick at it: — well, what will you have on't?
Page 11 - Our greatest glory is, not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.
Page 251 - ... calamities of decaying nature, and the consciousness of surviving every pleasure, would at once induce him, with his own hand, to terminate the scene of misery ; but happily the contempt of death forsakes him at a time when it could only be prejudicial, and life acquires an imaginary value in proportion as its real value is no more.

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