The British Critic: A New Review, Volume 10

Front Cover
F. and C. Rivington, 1798 - Theology
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 583 - Sir Joshua Reynolds was, on very many accounts, one of the most memorable men of his time. He was the first Englishman who added the praise of the elegant arts to the other glories of his country. In taste, in grace, in facility, in happy invention, and in the richness and harmony of colouring, he was equal to the great masters of the renowned ages.
Page 343 - My care is like my shadow in the sun, Follows me flying, flies when I pursue it; Stands and lies by me, does what...
Page 584 - Luca Giordano, and others, that I might mention, which we seek after with avidity : from the former we learn to think originally. May I presume to introduce myself on this occasion, and even to mention, as an instance of the truth of what I have remarked, the very Discourses which I have had the honour of delivering from this place ? Whatever merit they have...
Page 583 - His talents of every kind, powerful from nature, and not meanly cultivated by letters; his social virtues in all the relations, and all the habitudes of life, rendered him the centre of a very great and unparalleled variety of agreeable societies, which will be dissipated by his death. He had too much merit not to excite some jealousy, too much innocence to provoke any enmity.
Page 590 - To conclude, I will venture to repeat in favour of Rubens, what I have before said in regard to the Dutch school — that those who cannot see the extraordinary merit of this great painter, either have a narrow conception of the variety of art, or are led away by the affectation of approving nothing but what comes from the Italian school.
Page 589 - Rubens in regard to his outline oftener proceeds from haste and carelessness, than from inability : there are in his great works, to which he seems to have paid more particular attention, naked figures as eminent for their drawing as for their colouring.
Page 588 - ... correspondent sensations, and make him feel a degree of that enthusiasm with which the painter was carried away. To this we may add the complete uniformity in all the parts of the work, so that the whole seems to be conducted, and grow out of one mind : every thing is of a piece, and fits its place.
Page 589 - ... kind. The difference of the manner of Rubens, from that of any other painter before him, is in nothing more...
Page 644 - I should suspect near a hundred are lost, for one that arrives at the perfect state of a fly. The eggs, in the first place, when ripe, often hatch of themselves, and the larva, without a nidus, crawls about till it dies ; others are washed off by the water, or are hatched by the sun and moisture thus applied together.
Page 585 - ... overbearing. The desire of shining in conversation was in him indeed a predominant passion; and if it must be attributed to vanity, let it at the same time be recollected, that it produced that loquaciousness from which his more intimate friends derived considerable advantage. The observations which he made on poetry, on life, and on every thing about us, I applied to our art; with what success others must judge.

Bibliographic information