History of England, Volume 5

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Page 26 - I am the husband, and all the whole isle is my lawful wife ; I am the head and it is my body...
Page 513 - ... of counsel and debate in parliament; and that in the handling and proceeding of those businesses every member of the house of parliament hath and of right ought to have freedom of speech, to propound, treat, reason, and bring to conclusion the same...
Page 34 - ... is this: that whereas the proud and ambitious tyrant doth think his kingdom and people are only ordained for...
Page 163 - God, be embraced and received by a hallelujah ; and let it be as Wales was, and as all the Heptarchy was, united to England, as the principal ; and •let all at last be compounded and united into one kingdom. And since the crown, the sceptre, and justice, and law, and all is resident and reposed here, there can be no fear to this...
Page 513 - ... that the liberties, franchises, privileges, and jurisdictions of parliament are the ancient and undoubted birthright and inheritance of the subjects of England; and that the arduous and urgent affairs concerning the king, state, and defence of the realm and of the church of England, and the maintenance and making of laws, and redress of mischiefs and grievances which daily happen within this realm are proper subjects and matter of counsel and debate in parliament...
Page 404 - I would not do him that disgrace as to return that gift back, much less to put it into a wrong hand ; and so it remains yet ready to be returned to whom your lordships shall appoint.
Page 401 - Prince in your house, and never such a Prince, whose presence deserveth to be made memorable by records and acts mixed of mercy and justice. Yourselves are either nobles (and compassion ever beateth in the veins of noble blood) or reverend prelates, who are the servants of Him that would not break the bruised reed nor quench the smoking flax.
Page 503 - Points of Sovereignty, in that Petition of yours, except the Striking of Coin ? For it contains the Violation of Leagues ; the particular Way how to govern a War-; and the Marriage of our...
Page 353 - At this conference was farther declared of a bishop, who was touched in this business, upon the bye, whose function was much honoured, but his person touched herein : this business depending being ordered against Edward Egerton, he procured a new reference thereof from the King to the lord Chancellor : his lordship demanded the parties to be bound in 6000 marks, to stand to his lordship's award : they having entered into that bond, his lordship awarded the matter against Edward Egerton for Sir Rowland...
Page 33 - ... means and to beware of quenching the spirit that worketh within them; and if they can find as yet no motion tending that way, to be studious to read and confer with learned men and to use all such means as may further their resolution, assuring themselves that as long as they are disconformable in religion from us they cannot be but half my subjects, be able to do but half service, and I to want the best half of them, which is their souls.

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