A Popular School History of the United States: In which are Inserted as Part of the Narrative Selections from the Writings of Eminent American Historians, and Other American Writers of Note

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Clark & Maynard, 1883 - United States - 363 pages
 

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Nice narratives about people, not just discussions about politics. Especially nice narrative and description of Washington, one that rivals the English historians descriptions of their favorite kings. Some parts are a bit confusing, such as the events surrounding the Louisiana purchase, especially for a beginner. 

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Page 3 - He has constrained our fellow-citizens, taken captive on the high seas, to bear arms against their country ; to become the executioners of their friends and brethren, or to fall themselves by their hands.
Page 2 - He has refused, for a long time after such dissolutions, to cause others to be elected; whereby the legislative powers, incapable of annihilation, have returned to the people at large for their exercise; the State remaining, in the meantime, exposed to all the danger of invasion from without, and convulsions within.
Page 191 - Though in reviewing the incidents of my administration, I am unconscious of intentional error, I am nevertheless too sensible of my defects, not to think it probable that I may have committed many errors. Whatever they may be, I fervently beseech the Almighty to avert or mitigate the evils to which they may tend. I shall also carry with me the hope that my country will never cease to view them with indulgence...
Page 177 - With a heart full of love and gratitude, I now take leave of you : I most devoutly wish that your latter days may be as prosperous and happy, as your former ones have been glorious and honorable.
Page 191 - Relying on its kindness in this, as in other things, and actuated by th'at fervent love toward it which is so natural to a man who views in it the native soil of himself and his progenitors for several generations, I anticipate, with pleasing expectation, that retreat in which I promise myself to realize, without alloy, the sweet enjoyment of partaking, in the midst of my fellow-citizens, the benign influence of good laws under a free government — the ever favorite object of my heart — and the...
Page 256 - Constitution of the United States of America was ratified, and also all acts and parts of acts of the General Assembly of this State ratifying amendments of the said Constitution, are hereby repealed; and that the union now subsisting between South Carolina and other States, under the name of the "United States of America,
Page 147 - Sink or swim, live or die, survive or perish, I give my hand and my heart to this vote. It is true, indeed*, that in the beginning we aimed not at Independence. But there's a Divinity which shapes our ends.
Page 191 - I shall also carry with me the hope that my country will never cease to view them with indulgence; and that, after fortyfive years of my life dedicated to its service with an upright zeal, the faults of incompetent abilities will be consigned to oblivion, as myself must soon be to the mansions of rest.
Page 139 - Three millions of people, armed in the holy cause of liberty, and in such a country as that which we possess, are invincible by any force which our enemy can send against us.

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