Prostitution, Sexuality, and the Law in Ancient Rome

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Oxford University Press, 2003 - History - 416 pages
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This is a study of the legal rules affecting the practice of female prostitution at Rome approximately from 200 B.C. to A.D. 250. It examines the formation and precise content of the legal norms developed for prostitution and those engaged in this profession, with close attention to their social context. McGinn's unique study explores the "fit" between the law-system and the socio-economic reality while shedding light on important questions concerning marginal groups, marriage, sexual behavior, the family, slavery, and citizen status, particularly that of women.
 

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Contents

Introduction Law in Society
3
2 Law in Society
4
3 Problems with Nonlegal Evidence
9
4 Honor and Shame
10
5 Marginal Status
14
6 Defining Prostitution
17
7 Prostitution Sexuality and the Law
18
Civic Disabilities The Status of Prostitutes and Pimps as Roman Citizens
21
5 The Rate of the Tax
264
6 Criticism of the Tax
268
7 Fictional Criticism and Later History of the Tax
269
Egypt and Palmyra
274
9 Profitability Legitimacy and Social Control
286
Ne Serva Prostituatur Restrictive Covenants in the Sale of Slaves
288
2 Four Covenants
289
3 Migration and Manumission
291

2 Religious Political and Civic Disabilities Imposed on Prostitutes and Pimps
23
3 Disabilities at Law
44
4 The Core of Infamia and the Community of Honor
65
The Lex lulia et Papia
70
2 Marriage with Prostitutes before Augustus
85
3 The Terms of the Lex lulia et Papia regarding Marriage with Practitioners of Prostitution
91
4 Marriage Practice and Possibilities
102
Emperors Jurists and the Lex lulia et Papia
105
2 Subsequent Legislation
106
3 Juristic Interpretation
120
The Lex lulia de Adulieriis Coercendis
140
2 The Status of the Mater Familias
147
3 The Adultera as Prostitute
156
4 Lettocinium
171
5 Exemptions
194
6 Pimps Prostitutes and the lus Occidendi
202
7 Social Policy and the Lex lulia on Adultery
207
Emperors Jurists and the Lex lulia de Adulteriis Coercendis
216
3 Juristic Interpretation
219
4 The Law on Adultery and the Policymaking Elite
245
The Taxation of Roman Prostitutes
248
2 The Evidence for Caligulas Introduction of the Tax
249
3 Caligulas Motives for Introducing the Tax
250
4 Methods of Collection
256
History
292
5 Ne Serva and Prostitution
304
6 Ne Serva and Slavery
306
7 Honor and Shame
311
8 Humanitas and Policy
316
Prostitution and the Law of the Jurists
320
FiduciaPledge
321
Inheritance Mandate and Usucapio in Sale
322
Condictio
324
Theft and Wrongful Appropriation of Slave Prostitutes
325
The Petitio Hereditatis Compromissum and Operae
328
Iniuria
331
Donatio
335
Conclusion Diversity and Unity in Roman Legal Perspectives on Prostitution
338
2 Prostitution and the Law
341
3 Public Policy
343
4 Society and Law
345
5 Unity in Diversity
347
Bibliography
349
Index of Sources
391
Index of Persons
403
Index of Subjects
408
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About the author (2003)

Thomas A. J. McGinn is at Vanderbilt University.

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