A Treatise on the Steam-engine in Its Various Applications to Mines, Mills, Steam Navigation, Railways, and Agriculture: With Theoretical Investigations Respecting the Motive Power of Heat and the Proper Proportions of Steam-engines, Elaborate Tables of the Right Dimensions of Every Part, and Practical Instructions for the Manufacture and Management of Every Species of Engine in Actual Use

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Longmans, Green, 1868 - Steam engineering - 495 pages
 

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Contents

I
45
II
89
III
161
IV
189
VI
244
VIII
271
X
301
XII
337
XIII
363
XIV
379
XV
389
XVII
405

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Page 10 - I have seen the water run like a constant fountain stream forty feet high ; one vessel of water rarefied by fire driveth up forty of cold water. And a man that tends the work is but to turn two cocks, that one vessel of water being consumed, another begins to force and re-fill with cold water, and so successively, the fire being tended and kept constant, which the self-same person may likewise abundantly perform in the interim between the necessity of turning the said cocks.
Page 9 - ... stopping and screwing up the broken end, as also the touch-hole, and, making a constant fire under it, within twenty-four hours it burst, and made a great crack...
Page 38 - ... turn, but readily and quietly took up whatever was presented by those around him, and astonished the idle and barren propounders of an ordinary theme, by the treasures which he drew from the mine they had unconsciously opened.
Page 18 - I call the steam vessel, must during the whole time the engine is at work be kept as hot as the steam that enters it, first, by enclosing it in a case of wood, or any other materials that transmit heat slowly; secondly, by surrounding it with steam or other heated bodies; and thirdly, by suffering neither water or any other substance colder than the steam to enter or touch it during that time.
Page 10 - ... to keep them sweet, running through several streets, and so performing the work of scavengers, as well as furnishing the inhabitants with sufficient water for their private occasions...
Page 82 - ... charcoal that burned without flame, was blown up to whiteness by an explosive mixture containing the fire-damp, without producing its inflammation. An iron rod at the highest degree of red heat, and at the common degree of white heat, did not inflame explosive mixtures of the fire-damp ; but, when in brilliant combustion, it produced the effect.
Page 27 - I considered how to produce rotative motions from them in the best manner ; and amongst various schemes which were subjected to trial, or which passed through my mind, none appeared so likely to answer the purpose as the application of the crank in the manner of the common turning-lathe (an invention of great merit, of which the humble inventor, and even its era, are unknown).
Page 202 - Let 17 times the length of the grate in inches be divided by the square root of the height of the chimney in feet, and the quotient is the area for the aperture at the top of the chimney in inches.
Page 18 - ... first, that vessel in which the powers of steam are to be employed to work the engine, which is called the cylinder...
Page 38 - ... to select from his inexhaustible stores what might be best adapted to the taste of his present hearers. As to their capacity, he gave himself no trouble; and, indeed, such was his singular talent for making all things plain, clear, and intelligible, that scarcely any one could be aware of such a deficiency in his presence. His talk too, though overflowing with information, had no resemblance to lecturing or solemn discoursing ; but, on the contrary, was full of colloquial spirit and pleasantry.

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