The Beauties of England and Wales, Or, Delineations, Topographical, Historical, and Descriptive, of Each County, Volume 15, Issue 2

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Thomas Hood, John Harris
Thomas Maiden, 1814 - Architecture
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Page 234 - Warwick; his father was a butcher, and I have been told heretofore by some of the neighbours that, when he was a boy, he exercised his father's trade; but when he killed a calf, he would do it in a high style and make a speech.
Page 100 - Yes,' the noble lady, upon an appointed day, got on horseback naked, with her hair loose, so that it covered all her body but...
Page 120 - A CENTURY OF THE NAMES AND SCANTLINGS OF SUCH INVENTIONS, as at present I can call to mind to have tried and perfected...
Page 131 - I had rather you would shoot me, than keep me alive to see the sad consequences of this fatal day.
Page 100 - ... continued to solicit him ; insomuch that he told her, if she would ride on horseback, naked, from one end of the town to the other, in the sight of all the people, he would grant her request. Whereunto she answered, But will you give me leave so to do ? And he replying yes...
Page 249 - Such was Roscommon, not more learn'd than good, With manners gen'rous as his noble blood; To him the wit of Greece and Rome was known, And ev'ry author's merit, but his own. Such late was Walsh — the Muse's judge and friend, Who justly knew to blame or to commend; To failings mild, but zealous for desert; The clearest head, and the sincerest heart.
Page 234 - Though, as Ben Johnson sayes of him, that he had but little Latine and lesse Greek, he understood Latine pretty well, for he had been in his younger yeares a schoolmaster in the countrey.
Page 146 - I have been told by some old people, who in their younger years were eyewitnesses of these pageants so acted, that the yearly confluence of people to see that shew was extraordinary great, and yielded no small advantage to this city.
Page 232 - He was received into the company then in being, at first in a very mean rank; but his admirable wit, and the natural turn of it to the stage, soon distinguished him, if not as an extraordinary actor, yet as an excellent writer.
Page 232 - Shakspeare luckily cast his eye upon it, and found something so well in it, as to engage him first to read it through, and afterwards to recommend Mr. Jonson and his writings to the publick.

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