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N AT I O N A L R E VIE W.

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LONDON : W. H. ALLEN & CO., 13 WATERLOO PLACE. S.W.

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- EGERTON, Hugh E.
EveRSHED, Henry . . . .
FARQUBARson, H.R., M.P.
FLORIs, Chas. L. . -

Practical Tory Administration .

The Eruptive Force of Modern Fana-
ticism - - - - - - -
The New Electorate in France and
the Men of the Third Republic

Keats' Place in English Poetry .

Competition and Free Trade .

Parliamentary Procedure . .

The Prospects of Fair Trade .

Two Views of the Novelist

The Truth about Allotments .
Cobden's Dream . - - - - -
Comfort and Safety in London
Theatres. • - - - - - -
Effects of Town Life upon the
Human Body . . . . . . .

Rise and Progress of the Poor-Law

System in relation to the Church

Extension of the Episcopate.

Our First Amphictyonic Council.

Decay of British Agriculture . . .

A Reply to Lord Randolph Churchill

The Centenary of Australia . . .

An Easy Solution of the Irish Land

Purchase Question - - -

How to Revive British Industries
without Taxing Food.

St. Luke's Summer . - - - -

Latest Phase of French Socialism .

Tory Foreign Policy Sixty Years

Ago . . . . . . . . . .

What Women Write and Read .

Personal Experiences of Bulgaria .
Richard Jefferies, and the Open Air
Charity in Talmudic Times -
“Go Ye and Teach.” . . .
Are Rich Landowners Idle 2 .
The Trade Malaise and its Causes .
Rome and Malaria . . . . .

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Fothergill, J. M., M.D.
FULLER, Rev. Morris, M.A.
GREGORY, Canon
GREswell, William .

HARRIs, William J.

HEATON, J. Henniker, M.P..
Holloway, George, M.P. .

Huxley, Leonard .

KAUFMANN, Rev. M.

KEBBEL, T. E. .

• LAYARD, Florence .

LEGH, T. W., M.P.

LYMINGToN, Wiscount, M.P..

MAGNUs, Lady .

MALLock, W. H. . .

MANNERs, Lady John.

MAvor, James .

MoRGAN, E. Strachan

70

318

166

685

799.

251

Author. PAGE
MoTT, Albert J. . . . . English Farms and the Price of

Food . . . . . . . . . . 529

NoFRIs, Edward S., M.P. . Fresh Work for Parliament . . . 415

Some Abuses in Public Speaking . 656

NoFTHcote, Sir H. Stafford,

Bart., M.P. . The Marquess of Wellesley and the
Earl of Iddesleigh. . . . . . 758

ONSLow, Earl of . . . . Dogs in Disgrace . . . . . . . 335

PALGRAVE, Prof. F. T. . . Poetry and the other Fine Arts . . 202

WHITMORE, C. A., M.P. . Has the Session been Unfruitful? 153
WILLERT, P. F. . . The Service of Man . . . . . . 46

T H E NATIONAL REVIEW.

No. 55–SEPTEMBER, 1887.

MR. GLADSTONE'S CONCESSIONS.

THERE can be no doubt that Mr. Gladstone's so-called concessions have operated to the advantage of his party in recent bye-elections; and candidates fighting under his standard have made especial use of what he is supposed to have conceded with regard to the retention of Irish members at Westminster. Sir George Trevelyan presents the most striking illustration of the effect produced by these concessions. So completely have they captivated him, that he has lost all patience with other Liberal Unionists who refuse to join him in his renewal of allegiance to Mr. Gladstone, and heaps reproaches on his former associates. They must (he says) be Tory Unionists, and only poor Tory Unionists into the bargain; traitors to the sacred cause of Liberalism, and contumacious rebels against the divine right of the Liberal party to rule the country. Moreover, they are wilfully ignoring or misrepresenting Mr. Gladstone's explicit declarations. That a statesman “with such a past” as the late Prime Minister should have been rebuffed when holding out the hand of friendship to effect a reunion of the Liberal party, fills Sir George with humiliation and indignation. And he is amazed that any Liberal Unionist leader should hesitate to enter into conference with a politician so simple and straightforward, so plain-spoken and invariably lucid in his meaning as Mr. Gladstone. A few reflections, therefore, on the real extent and value of these concessions, which have entranced Sir George, may be offered by a Liberal Unionist, to whom even the disruption of the Liberal Party appears to be a light calamity, when weighed in the balance with the disruption of the United Kingdom. There were four main points in Mr. Gladstone's Irish policy of last year, about which division arose in the Liberal ranks. They were (i.) the employment of British credit for buying out Irish landlords, and the consequent liabilities imposed on British taxWOI. X. 1

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