Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the English Courts of Common Law: With Tables of the Cases and Principal Matters, Volume 26

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T. & J.W. Johnson, 1853 - Law reports, digests, etc
 

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Contents

I
13
II
41
III
50
IV
81
V
96
VI
136
VII
150
VIII
164
IX
195
X
229
XI
253
XII
271
XIII
303
XIV
430
XV
459
XVI
499

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Page 229 - Yorkshire, a verdict, by consent, was found for the plaintiff, subject to the opinion of the court on a special case...
Page 23 - interest or no interest," or "without further proof of interest than the policy itself," or "without benefit of salvage to the insurer...
Page 438 - Easter term, when a verdict was found for the plaintiffs, subject to the opinion of the court, on a case...
Page 253 - The question for the opinion of the court was whether the plaintiff was entitled to recover. If...
Page 368 - THE antiquity and excellence of this trial, for the settling of civil property, has before been explained at large'. And it will hold much stronger in criminal cases ; since, in times of difficulty and danger, more is to be apprehended from the violence and partiality of judges appointed by the crown, in suits between the king and the subject, than in disputes between one individual and another, to settle the metes and boundaries of private property.
Page 268 - I take it to be a general rule, that if a person sells goods ( supposing at the time of the contract he is dealing with a principal), but afterwards discovers that the person with whom he has been dealing is not the principal in the transaction, but agent for a third person, though he may, in the meantime, have debited the agent with it, he may afterwards recover the amount from the real principal...
Page 408 - F. farmer; you may say this, guilty of publishing ; but whether a libel or not, the jury do not find.
Page 395 - To say that corrupt officers are appointed to administer affairs is certainly a reflection on the government. If people should not be called to account for possessing the people with an ill opinion of the government, no government can subsist, for it is very necessary for all governments that the people should have a good opinion of it. And nothing can be worse to any government than to endeavor to procure animosities; as to the management of it, this has been always looked upon as a crime, and no...
Page 405 - The liberty of the press consists in printing without any previous license, subject to the consequences of law. The licentiousness of the press is Pandora's Box, the source of every evil. Miserable is the condition of individuals, dangerous is the condition of the State, if there is no certain law, or, which is the same thing, no certain administration of law to protect individuals, or to guard the State.
Page 400 - Asaph, the motion to set aside the verdict, and to grant a new trial, upon account of the misdirection of the Judge, supposes that upon this verdict (either as a general, or as minutes of a special verdict to be reduced into form), judgment may be given : — for if the verdict was defective, and omitted finding...

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