Elements of Mental Philosophy Enbracing the Two Departments of the Intellect and the Sensibilities, Volume 1

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Harper & Brothers, 1841 - Intellect
 

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Contents

The same subject further illustrated
65
Subject illustrated from the case of Jaines Mitchell 42 Illustration from the case of Caspar Hauser
67
Of counatural or innate knowledge 44 The doctrine of innate knowledge not susceptible of proof
70
The doctrine tried by the idea of a
71
The discussion of this subject superseded and unnecessary
73
The mind may be regarded in a threeſold point of view
74
SENSATION AND PERCEPTION 48 Sensation a simple mental state originating in the senses
76
All sensation is properly and truly in the mind 50 Sensations are not images or resemblances of objects
78
The connexion between the mental and physical change not sus ceptible of explanation 52 Of the meaning and nature of perception
80
Further proof from varivus writers on the mind
81
Of the secondary qualities of matter
82
Of the nature of mental powers or faculties
83
THE SENSES OF SMELL AND TASTE 56 Nature and importance of the senses as a source of knowledge
84
Of the connexion of the brain with sensation and
85
Order in which the senses are to be considered
86
Of the sense and sensation of smell 60 Of perceptions of smell in distinction from sensations 61 Of the sense and sensation of taste
87
Design and uses of the senses of smell and taste
89
THE SENSE OF HEARING 63 Organ of the sense of hearing
90
Nature of sonorous bodies and the medium of the communication of sound
91
Varieties of the sensation of
92
Manner in which we learn the place of sounds
93
Application of these views to the art of ventriloquism
94
Uses of hearing and its connexion with oral language
96
THE SENSE OF TOUCH 69 Of the sense of touch and its sensations in general
97
Idea of externality suggested in connexion with the touch
98
Relation between the sensation and what is outwardly signified
104
Of habit in relation to the taste
138
Other striking instances of habits of touch
146
Notice of some facts which favour the above doctrine
152
CONCEPTIONS
158
Influence of habit on conceptions of sight
161
Conceptions as connected with fictitious representations
167
The precise sense in which complexness is to be understood
173
ABSTRACTION
180
140
185
Early classifications sometimes incorrect
186
Of general abstract truths or principles
192
OF ATTENTION
198
Knowledge begins in the senses but has iniernal accessions
228
Of association caused by present objects of perception
231
Ideas of existence mind selfexistence and personal identity
234
Nature of succession and origin of the idea of succession
240
The idea of space has its origin in suggestion
246
Origin of the ideas of moral merit and demerit
252
195
254
Consciousness a ground or law of belief
258
Of committing to writing as a means of aiding the memory
260
202
263
Of high and low notes in music
298
Benefit of examining such connexions of thought
304
Of memory as a ground or law of belief
310
249
314
Further illustrations of philosophic memory
317
DURATION OF MEMORY
331
Application of the principles of this chapter to education
337
Process of the mind in all cases of reasoning
344
Of reasoning posteriori
351
Use of definitions and axioms in demonstrative reasoning
357
Further considerations on the influence of demonstrative reasoning
363
Of reasoning by induction
369
Of adherence to our opinions
380
Further remarks on the same subject
386
Works of imagination give different degrees of pleasure
392
Feelings of sympathy aided by the imagination
398
Not the same internal complex ideas in all languages
404
CONNEXION OF THE MIND AND BODY
411
This doctrine of use in explaining mental phenomena
417
Of the less permanent excited conceptions of sound
421
First cause of permanently vivid conceptions or apparitions
422
Fourth cause of apparitions and other excited conceptions
428
Disordered state or insanity of original suggestion
434
Of the power of reasoning in the partially insane
440
TOTAL INSANITY OR DELIRIUM
446
366
451
Of moral accountability in mental alienation
452

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Page 71 - For the invisible things of God from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even His eternal power and Godhead...
Page 199 - The crow doth sing as sweetly as the lark, When neither is attended ; and, I think The nightingale, if she should sing by day, When every goose is cackling, would be thought No better a musician than the wren.
Page 220 - ... as we do from bodies affecting our senses. This source of ideas every man has wholly in himself; and though it be not sense, as having nothing to do with external objects, yet it is very like it, and might properly enough be called internal sense.
Page 330 - Lulled in the countless chambers of the brain, Our thoughts are linked by many a hidden chain. Awake but one, and lo, what myriads rise ! * Each stamps its image as the other flies.
Page 204 - IN Xanadu did Kubla Khan A stately pleasure-dome decree : Where Alph, the sacred river, ran Through caverns measureless to man Down to a sunless sea. So twice five miles of fertile ground With walls and towers were girdled round : And there were gardens bright with sinuous rills Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree ; And here were forests ancient as the hills, Enfolding sunny spots...
Page 389 - Invention is one of the great marks of genius ; but if we consult experience we shall find, that it is by being conversant with the inventions of others that we learn to invent, as by reading the thoughts of others we learn to think.
Page 392 - He was passionately fond of the beauties of nature ; and I recollect once he told me, when I was admiring a distant prospect in one of our morning walks, that the sight of so many smoking cottages gave a pleasure to his mind, which none could understand who had not witnessed, like himself, the happiness and the worth which they contained.
Page 417 - The sooty films that play upon the bars Pendulous, and foreboding in the view Of superstition, prophesying still, Though still deceived, some stranger's near approach.
Page 220 - Secondly, the other fountain from which experience furnisheth the understanding with ideas is,— the perception of the operations of our own mind within us, as it is employed about the ideas it has got;— which operations, when the soul comes to reflect on and consider, do furnish the understanding with another set of ideas, which could not be had from things without. And such are perception, thinking, doubting...
Page 397 - ... his children — But here my heart began to bleed, and I was forced to go on with another part of the portrait.

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