With the Greeks in Thessaly

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L.C. Page and Company, 1898 - Greco-Turkish War, 1897 - 277 pages
 

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Page 150 - ... and again came on in grand style, regardless of the hail of the Greek fusillade and the shrapnel from the Greek battery in the hollow. Once and again the Turks were obliged to halt, to falter, and then retire. The slopes were strewn with dead and wounded. At 6 o'clock another determined assault was made by the Turks on the Greek position along the series of low hills above Velestino, especially on Caradaon, the Turks being plainly re-enforced by two more battalions.
Page 153 - ... quivered for a moment, then turned and retired in confusion to the shelter of the mountain ridges beyond. It was a brilliant success for the Greeks. At the end of the day the Greek position, at every point, notwithstanding the change of front, was held against a numerically superior enemy. Darkness only interfered with the progress of the battle. The Greeks had vindicated their honour as courageous soldiers ; and the judgment of their General in selecting his defensive position was amply justified....
Page 229 - Non-receipt of overdue notices does not exempt the borrower from overdue fines. Harvard College Widener Library Cambridge, MA 02138 617-495-2413 WIDENER Please handle with care. Thank you for helping to preserve library collections at Harvard.
Page 159 - Turkish attack developing on our right, their infantry being extended under cover of a screen of cavalry. At eleven o'clock a fierce assault was made by the Turkish infantry...
Page 159 - ... brought into action, and followed up by a sustained infantry attack it was not difficult to foretell that the end was near. By five o'clock the ammunition of the Greek batteries was all but exhausted, and Smolenskis gave instructions for the withdrawal of the artillery on his right over the pass to Volo. While this was being done the Turkish fire from the large field-guns was resumed at a very quick rate, and rendered the village of Velestino untenable, as also the ridges to the west. On the...
Page 159 - ... artillery fire from the Turkish right battery was evidently meant to demoralize the Greek infantry, but the shells fell wide and seldom exploded. Meanwhile, the Greek infantry peppered the Turkish lines with well-directed volleys, and the Greek battery on the plateau played havoc with a beautifully-served fire. "At a quarter to twelve the Turkish infantry swarmed down from their intrenchments into the gulch with the intention of charging the Greek position on the hill, but they were shattered...
Page 159 - Greek infantry. But the shells fell wide, and comparatively few exploded. Meantime the Greek infantry peppered the Turkish lines with well-directed volleys, and the battery on the plateau played havoc with their splendidly served fire. At a quarter to twelve the Turkish infantry swarmed down from their intrenchments into the gulch, with the intention of charging the Greek position on the hills. They were, however, shattered before they reached the bottom of the valley by the Greek fire, while four...
Page 159 - ... back from what had been a commanding position, their centre having been weakened by the withdrawal of about 1200 men for the useless occupation of Trikkala. In this retirement a single company of infantry remained at its post for a time, and as one correspondent on the Turkish side described it, " fought against heavy odds with magnificent bravery. Being unsupported, its gallant stand was all in vain, and it, too, was obliged to fall back before a steadily advancing enemy.
Page xviii - Lorimer, 5 of Edinburgh University, when prating to his students on the Law of Nature, held that almost never was the voice of the people the voice of God. It was generally, he emphasized in his sweet thin voice, the voice of the Devil. " A notation of the cries in the air at a time of surgent public excitement," says George Meredith,
Page 24 - ... contact with the men. There was no habit of implicit obedience to orders, and I have actually seen an officer approach a private and implore him as a favour to do what he had been told by his non-commissioned drill-instructor. On another occasion, when a smart shower of rain came on during drill, a battalion simply melted away to seek the shelter of the nearest trees. One trained in British methods, much more one cognizant of the stern discipline of the German army, must have been shocked at...

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