The gentle shepherd. To which is prefixed a mem. of the author

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Page 11 - I've heard my honest uncle aften say, That lads should a' for wives that's virtuous pray ; For the maist thrifty man could never get A well-stored room, unless his wife wad let : Wherefore nocht shall be wanting on my part, To gather wealth to raise my shepherd's heart : Whate'er he wins, I'll guide wi' canny care, And win the vogue at market, tron, or fair, For halesome, clean, cheap, and sufficient ware. A flock o' lambs, cheese, butter, and some woo, Shall first be said to pay the laird his due...
Page 12 - Nae mair of that ! Dear Jenny, to be free, There's some men constanter in love than we ; Nor is the ferly great, when nature kind Has blest them...
Page 4 - Where a' the sweets o' spring an' simmer grow : Between twa birks, out o'er a little lin, The water fa's an' maks a singan din : A pool breast-deep, beneath as clear as glass, Kisses, wi' easy whirls, the bord'ring grass.
Page xvii - Fly'st thou, displeas'd, the commerce of mankind? O! teach our steps to find the secret cell, "Where, with thy sire Content, thou lov'st to dwell. Or say, dost thou a duteous handmaid wait, Familiar at the chambers of the great ? Dost thou pursue the voice of them that call To noisy revel, and to midnight ball?
Page xxviii - I wish nae mair of a' that's rare. My Peggy speaks sae sweetly, To a' the lave I'm cauld; But she gars a' my spirits glow, At wauking of the fauld. My Peggy smiles sae kindly, Whene'er I whisper love. That I look down on a' the town, — That I look down upon a crown.
Page 4 - JENNY. Come, Meg, let's fa' to wark upon this green, This shining day will bleach our linen clean ; The water's clear, the lift unclouded blue, Will make them like a lily wet with dew. PEGGY. Gae farer up the burn to Habbie's How, Where a' the sweets of spring and simmer grow.
Page iii - This sunny morning, Roger, cheers my blood, And puts all nature in a jovial mood. How heartsome is't to see the rising plants, — To hear the birds chirm o'er their pleasing rants! How halesome is't to snuff the cawler air.
Page xxviii - I look down on a' the town, — That I look down upon a crown. My Peggy smiles sae kindly, It makes me blyth and bauld; And naething gi'es me sic delight As wauking of the fauld. My Peggy sings sae saftly, When on my pipe I play, By a' the rest it is confest, — By a' the rest, that she sings best.
Page 11 - A flock of lambs, cheese, butter, and some woo', Shall first be sald to pay the laird his due ; Syne a' behind's our ain. Thus, without fear, Wi' love and rowth we thro' the warld will steer, And when my Pate in bairns and gear grows rife, Hell bless the day he gat me for his wife. JENNY. ' ' But what if some young giglet on the green Wi...
Page xxviii - I'm not very auld, Yet well I like to meet her at The wauking of the fauld. My Peggy speaks sae sweetly, Whene'er we meet alane, I wish nae mair to lay my care, I wish nae mair of a' that's rare. My Peggy speaks sae sweetly, To a' the lave I'm cauld ; But she gars a' my spirits glow At wauking of the fauld.

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