Shakespeare's History of King Henry the Sixth ...

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Harper & brothers, 1882

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Page 154 - Not all the water in the rough rude sea Can wash the balm from an anointed king ; The breath of worldly men cannot depose The deputy elected by the Lord.
Page 126 - And so I was, which plainly signified That I should snarl, and bite, and play the dog. Then, since the heavens have shap'd my body so, Let hell make crook'd my mind to answer it. I have no brother, I am like no brother ; And this word love...
Page 61 - Ah, what a life were this ! How sweet ! How lovely ! Gives not the hawthorn bush a sweeter shade To shepherds, looking on their silly sheep, Than doth a rich embroider'd canopy To kings, that fear their subjects' treachery ? O, yes, it doth; a thousand fold it doth.
Page 61 - To kings, that fear their subjects' treachery ? O, yes it doth ; a thousand-fold it doth. And to conclude, — the shepherd's homely curds, His cold thin drink out of his leather bottle, His wonted sleep under a fresh tree's shade, All which secure and sweetly he enjoys, Is far beyond a prince's delicates, His viands sparkling in a golden cup, • His body couched in a curious bed, When care, mistrust, and treason wait on him.
Page 165 - And nothing can we call our own but death, And that small model of the barren earth Which serves as paste and cover to our bones.
Page 79 - I smile, And cry, Content, to that which grieves my heart ; And wet my cheeks with artificial tears, And frame my face to all occasions.
Page 61 - O God ! methinks it were a happy life To be no better than a homely swain : To sit upon a hill, as I do now, To carve out dials quaintly, point by point...
Page 14 - God's name, let it go: I'll give my jewels for a set of beads, My gorgeous palace for a hermitage, My gay apparel for an almsman's gown, My...
Page 115 - I that ? my mangled body shows, My blood, my want of strength, my sick heart shows, That I must yield my body to the earth, And, by my fall, the conquest to my foe. Thus yields the cedar to the axe's edge, Whose arms gave shelter to the princely eagle, Under whose shade the ramping lion slept ; Whose top-branch overpeer'd Jove's spreading tree, And kept low shrubs from winter's powerful wind.
Page 124 - The bird that hath been limed in a bush, With trembling wings misdoubteth every bush...

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