Schumpeter's Market: Enterprise and Evolution

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Edward Elgar Publishing, Jan 1, 2004 - Business & Economics - 294 pages
Examining the evidence from all Schumpeter's published work, the book aims to fill a gap in the literature of economic thought. Partly because Schumpeter was so prolific, partly because he touched on so many inter-related topics, there have been few b

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Contents

83 ALLOCATIVE EFFICIENCY
151
The sociology of socialism
159
91 CULTURE AND SOCIALISM
160
92 NATIONAL CHARACTER
164
93 POWER AND PARTICIPATION
168
Continuity and change
177
101 SOCIETY
178
102 ECONOMY
189

The capitalist economy
48
42 THE ENTREPRENEUR
56
43 ENTREPRENEURSHIP WHAT IT IS NOT
65
Corporate capitalism
71
51 INDIVIDUAL AND TEAM
72
52 COMPETITION AND MONOPOLY
80
53 MONOPOLY AND INNOVATION
87
The sociology of capitalism
97
61 SOCIAL STRATIFICATION
98
62 IMPERIALISM AND EXCHANGE
109
63 MOTIVATION
115
The socialist economy
122
72 FROM CORPORATION TO STATE
127
73 COUNTERVAILING FORCES
135
Market and plan
139
81 PRODUCTIVE EFFICIENCY
140
82 MARKET SOCIALISM
145
103 POLITY
194
Continuity change and socialism
205
111 SOCIETY
208
112 ECONOMY
212
113 POLITY
216
The macroeconomics of success
220
121 GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT
221
122 SAVINGS AND INVESTMENT
223
123 EMPLOYMENT AND PRICES
234
The cycle
243
131 EVOLUTION IN WAVES
244
132 PEAKS AND TROUGHS
251
133 CONTINUITY AND BREACH
258
Conclusion
270
References
272
Index
283
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 18 - The mode of production in material life determines the general character of the social, political and spiritual processes of life. It is not the consciousness of men that determines their existence, but on the contrary their social existence that determines their consciousness.
Page 58 - The bourgeoisie cannot exist without constantly revolutionizing the instruments of production, and thereby the relations of production, and with them the whole relations of society.
Page 58 - Constant revolutionizing of production, uninterrupted disturbance of all social conditions, everlasting uncertainty and agitation distinguish the bourgeois epoch from all earlier ones. All fixed, fast-frozen relations, with their train of ancient and venerable prejudices and opinions, are swept away, all new-formed ones become antiquated before they can ossify. All that is solid melts into air...
Page 57 - The fundamental impulse that sets and keeps the capitalist engine in motion comes from the new consumers' goods, the new methods of production or transportation, the new markets, the new forms of industrial organization that capitalist enterprise creates.
Page 57 - I may use that biological term — that incessantly revolutionizes the economic structure from within, incessantly destroying the old one, incessantly creating a new one.
Page 58 - Schumpeter (1975/1942, p. 132) argues that "the function of entrepreneurs is to reform or revolutionize the pattern of production by exploiting an invention or, more generally, an untried technological possibility for producing a new commodity or producing an old one in a new way, by opening up a new source of supply of materials or a new outlet for production, by reorganizing an industry and so on.
Page 81 - As soon as we go into details and inquire into the individual items in which progress was most conspicuous, the trail leads not to the doors of those firms that work under conditions of comparatively free competition but precisely to the doors of the large concerns...
Page 137 - Not ideas, but material and ideal interests, directly govern men's conduct. Yet very frequently the ‘world images' that have been created by ‘ideas' have, like switchmen, determined the tracks along which action has been pushed by the dynamic of interest.
Page 86 - It is, however, the producer who as a rule initiates economic change, and consumers are educated by him if necessary; they are, as it were, taught to want new things, or things which differ in some respect or other from those which they have been in the habit of using. Therefore, while it is permissible and even necessary to consider consumers...

About the author (2004)

Reisman is Professor of Economics in the University of Surrey.

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