The Stranger's Guide Through the City of York, and Its Cathedral: Illustrated with a Plan of the City, and 15 Wood Engravings. The Whole Now First Compiled from Original and Authentic Documents

Front Cover
Bellerby's New Circulating Library, 1825 - York (England) - 152 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 88 - ... mausoleums? The time must come when its gilded vaults, which now spring so loftily, shall lie in rubbish beneath the feet; when, instead of the sound of melody and praise, the wind shall whistle through the broken arches, and the owl hoot from the shattered tower — when the garish sunbeam shall break into these gloomy mansions of death; and the ivy twine round the fallen column; and the fox-glove hang its blossoms about the nameless urn, as if in mockery of the dead. Thus man passes away; his...
Page 52 - Or the unseen Genius of the wood. But let my due feet never fail To walk the studious cloister's pale, And love the high embowed roof, With antique pillars massy proof, And storied windows richly dight, Casting a dim religious light.
Page 106 - Clifford's tower, which consumed to ashes all the interior thereof, leaving standing only the outshell of the walls of the tower, without other harm to the city, save one man slain by the fall of a piece of timber, blown up by the force of the flames, or rather by some powder therein. It was generally thought a wilful act, the soldiers not suffering the citizens to enter till it was too late ; and what made it CHAP. x. more suspicious was, that the gunner had got out all his goods before it was discovered.
Page 102 - ... bricks ; beyond which the wall is imperfect, and capped with modern building. In all this height, there is not any casement or loophole, but one entire and uniform wall ; from which we may infer that this wall was built some courses higher, after the same order. The bricks were to be as thoroughs, or as it were so many new foundations, to that which was to be superstructed, and to bind the two sides together firmly ; for the wall itself is only faced with small square stone, and the middle thereof...
Page 56 - They were about 44 on a side, about two feet distance from one another, and as much in diameter. Those in the midst were fewer in number, larger, and exactly fronted the entrance of the great west door, that circle nearest the entrance in this row being the largest of all.
Page 57 - They were about forty-four on a side, about two foot distance from one another, and as much in diameter. Those in the midst were fewer in number, larger, and exactly fronted the entrance of the great west door. The circle nearest the entrance being the largest of all.
Page 101 - The outside to the river, is faced with a very small saxum quadratum of about four inches thick, and laid in levels like our modern brickwork. The length of the stones is not observed, but they are as they fell out, in hewing. From the foundation, twenty courses of these small squared stones are laid, and over them five courses of Roman brick. These bricks are placed some length-ways, some end-ways in the wall, and were called lateres diatoni...
Page 82 - But one sad losel soils a name for aye, However mighty in the olden time ; Nor all that heralds rake from coffin'd clay, Nor florid prose, nor honied lies of rhyme, Can blazon evil deeds, or consecrate a crime.
Page 102 - These bricks are placed some length-ways, some end-ways in the wall, and were called lateres diatoni; after these five courses of brick, other twenty-two courses of .small square stones, as before described, are laid, which raise the wall some feet higher, and then five more courses of the same Roman bricks ; beyond which the wall is imperfect, and capped with modern building. In all this height, there is not any casement or loophole, but one entire and uniform wall ; from which we may infer that...
Page 113 - ... to Bootham Bar ; from thence to Monk Bar ten towers, and to Layerthorpe Postern four towers; for some distance the deep waters of the Foss defended this part of the city without the walls ; and from thence to Walmgate Bar three towers ; then Fishergate Bar, walled up in the time of Henry VII., and three towers, the last a postern ; from which by a bridge over the Foss, to the Castle, and the ruins of five towers, were all that remained of it. On the west side of the river was put a tower, from...

Bibliographic information