Art in Turmoil: The Chinese Cultural Revolution, 1966-76

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UBC Press, 2010 - Art - 282 pages

Forty years after China's tumultuous Cultural Revolution, this book revisits the visual and performing arts of the period – the paintings, propaganda posters, political cartoons, sculpture, folk arts, private sketchbooks, opera, and ballet – and examines what these vibrant, militant, often gaudy images meant to artists, their patrons, and their audiences at the time, and what they mean now, both in their original forms and as revolutionary icons reworked for a new market-oriented age. Chapters by scholars of Chinese history and art and by artists whose careers were shaped by the Cultural Revolution offer new insights into works that have transcended their times.

 

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Contents

page
8
The Art of the Cultural Revolution
27
page
44
Inside Shi Lus Imagination
58
colour after page
74
in colour
82
An Art School and Its Artists
93
Up to the Mountains Down to
107
From Revolutionary Icon to Market
136
Model Theatrical Works and the Remodelling of the Cultural
167
Feminism in the Revolutionary Model Ballets The WhiteHaired Girl
188
ballet after page
198
Making the Militant Hero Prominent
203
Notes
216
Bibliography
245
Index
259

The Rent Collection Courtyard Past and Present
121
media installation 1999
132

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About the author (2010)

Richard King is the director of the Centre for Asia-Pacific Initiatives and an associate professor of Chinese studies at the University of Victoria.

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