A Room of One's Own: And, Three Guineas

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 1998 - English fiction - 433 pages
230 Reviews
In A Room of One's Own and Three Guineas, Virginia Woolf considers with energy and wit the implications of the historical exclusion of women from education and from economic independence. In A Room of One's Own (1929), she examines the work of past women writers, and looks ahead to a time when women's creativity will not be hampered by poverty, or by oppression. In Three Guineas (1938), however, Woolf argues that women's historical exclusion offers them the chance to form a political and cultural identity which could challenge the drive towards fascism and war.
 

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5 stars
105
4 stars
74
3 stars
33
2 stars
11
1 star
7

Her prose and her arguments are seductive. - LibraryThing
Her writing is so eloquent. - LibraryThing
It's a great feminist text but her writing is amazing. - LibraryThing
But I love her writing. - LibraryThing
A book worthy of reading by any reader or writer. - LibraryThing
Virginia Woolf's classic essay on women and writing. - LibraryThing

Review: A Room of One's Own / Three Guineas

User Review  - Leah - Goodreads

I highlighted the heck out of this book. So many good quotes! Read full review

Review: A Room of One's Own / Three Guineas

User Review  - Eva Pollitt - Goodreads

Favorite Quotes: "By hook or by crook, I hope that you will possess yourselves of money enough to travel and to idle, to contemplate the future or the past of the world, to dream over books and loiter ... Read full review

Contents

A ROOM OF ONES OWN i
113
NOTES AND REFERENCES
368
Explanatory Notes to A Room of Ones Own
415

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About the author (1998)

Virginia Woolf is by reputation one of the foremost modernist literary figures of the twentieth century. Morag Shiach is at Queen Mary and Westfield College, University of London.

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