The Lusiad: Or, The Discovery of India. An Epic Poem, Volume 1

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Page cccxlvi - The birds their quire apply ; airs, vernal airs, Breathing the smell of field and grove, attune The trembling leaves, while universal Pan, Knit with the Graces and the Hours in dance, Led on the eternal Spring.
Page cclxvi - ... they transport his goods from one place to another. Those agents frequently live with the profusion of princes; and sometimes, too, in spite of that profusion, and by a proper method of making up their accounts, acquire the fortunes of princes. It was thus, as we are told by Machiavel, that the agents of Lorenzo of Medicis, not a prince of mean abilities, carried on his trade.
Page cccxlvi - And heavenly quires the hymenaean sung, What day the genial Angel to our sire Brought her in naked beauty more adorn'd, More lovely, than Pandora, whom the Gods Endow'd with all their gifts, and O ! too like In sad event, when to the unwiser son Of Japhet brought by Hermes, she ensnared Mankind with her fair looks, to be avenged On him who had stole Jove's authentic fire.
Page cccxxiv - O could I flow like thee! and make thy stream My great example, as it is my theme ! Tho
Page cccxvi - But the poets and writers of histories are the best doctors of this knowledge; where we may find painted forth with great life, how affections are kindled and incited; and how pacified and refrained; and how again contained from act and further degree; how they disclose themselves, how they work, how they vary, how they gather and fortify, how they are inwrapped one within another, and how they do fight and encounter one with another...
Page ccclxiv - Greek fnch length of feas explore, The Greek, who forrow to the Cyclop wrought; And he, who, victor, with the harpies fought, Never fuch pomp of naval honours wore. Great as thou art, and peerlefs in renown, Yet thou to Camoens...
Page lxvii - With such mad seas the daring Gama fought, For many a day, and many a dreadful night, Incessant, labouring round the stormy Cape ; By bold ambition led, and bolder thirst Of gold.
Page ccc - Jews, in the finest strain of poetry, are represented as hanging their harps on the willows by the rivers of Babylon, and weeping their exile from their native country. Here Camoens continued some time, till an opportunity offered to carry him to Goa.
Page cccxiii - Parnassus. It is a pleasant air, but a barren soil ; and there are very few instances of those who have added to their patrimony by any thing they have reaped from thence.
Page cclxiii - Upon other occasions the order has been reversed ; and a rich field of rice or other grain has been ploughed up, in order to make room for a plantation of poppies ; when the chief foresaw that extraordinary profit was likely to be made by opium.

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