Barefoot Zen: The Shaolin Roots of Kung Fu and Karate

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Weiser Books, Nov 15, 2000 - Sports & Recreation - 265 pages
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The author demonstrates that the traditional movements of both Kung Fu and Karate grew from the spiritual practices of the Shaolin order of Buddhist monks. Contrary to popular belief, they were not intended as a form of self defence, but used as a method of kinetic meditation to transcend fear.
 

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Provides a strong historical perspective to the Shaolin derrived arts and some of the foundations of Chan (Zen) Buddhism. Some of the historical claims are not well referenced but the majority of the text is very well researched, if somewhat subjective in places.

Contents

V
3
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17
VII
43
VIII
57
IX
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XII
75
XIII
79
XVII
171
XVIII
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XIX
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XXI
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XXIV
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XXV
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XIV
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XV
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XVI
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About the author (2000)

Nathan J. Johnson spent seven years learning Buddhism in a contemporary monastery. He holds a fifth degree black belt in Karate, a fourth degree black sash in Chinese Kung Fu and teaches Chinese empty hand arts and simple meditation techniques. He holds seminars and gives lectures throughout both Great Britain and the USA. His previous book, Zen Shaolin Karate has had several printings. He lives in Hampshire, England where he was born.

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