Intelligence and Government in Britain and the United States: A Comparative Perspective [2 volumes]: A Comparative Perspective

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ABC-CLIO, Apr 6, 2012 - Political Science - 826 pages

Intelligence and Government in Britain and the United States: A Comparative Perspective is an intensive, comparative exploration of the role of organizational and political culture in the development of the intelligence communities of America and her long-time ally. Each national system is examined as a detailed case study set in a common conceptual and theoretical framework. The first volume lays out that framework and examines the U.S. intelligence community. The second volume offers the U.K. case study as well as overall conclusions.

Particular attention is paid here to the fundamentally different concepts of what "intelligence" entails in the United States and United Kingdom, as well as to the nations' different approaches to managing change- and information-intensive activities. The impact of these differences is demonstrated by examining the evolution of the two intelligence communities from their inceptions prior to World War II through their development during the Cold War and the transformations that have taken place since, especially in the wake of the September 2001 terrorist attacks and 2003 invasion of Iraq.

 

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About the author (2012)

Philip H.J. Davies, PhD, is director of the Brunel Centre for Intelligence and Security Studies at Brunel University, London, England.

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