The Sporting magazine; or Monthly calendar of the transactions of the turf, the chace, and every other diversion interesting to the man of pleasure and enterprize

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Page 235 - As if increase of appetite had grown By what it fed on; and yet, within a month, Let me not think on't: Frailty, thy name is woman!
Page 140 - For my part, when I behold a fashionable table set out in all its magnificence, I fancy that I see gouts and dropsies, fevers and lethargies, with other innumerable distempers lying in ambuscade among the dishes.
Page 76 - And thou opposed, being of no woman born, Yet I will try the last. Before my body I throw my warlike shield. Lay on, Macduff, And damned be him that first cries "Hold enough!
Page 222 - That, viewing it, we seem almost to obtain Our innocent sweet simple years again. This fond attachment to the well-known place Whence first we started into life's long race, Maintains its hold with such unfailing sway, We feel it e'en in age, and at our latest day.
Page 75 - Still must I hear ? — shall hoarse * Fitzgerald bawl His creaking couplets in a tavern hall, And I not sing...
Page 219 - This senior-junior, giant-dwarf, Dan Cupid: Regent of love -rhymes, lord of folded arms, The anointed sovereign of sighs and groans...
Page 119 - Tis sweet to hear the watch-dog's honest bark Bay deep-mouth'd welcome as we draw near home; 'Tis sweet to know there is an eye will mark Our coming, and look brighter when we come...
Page 85 - But he that shall consider the variety of baits for all seasons, and pretty devices which our anglers have invented, peculiar lines, false flies, several sleights, &c., will say that it deserves like commendation, requires as much study and perspicacity as the rest, and is to be preferred before many of them. Because hawking and hunting are very laborious, much riding and many dangers accompany them ; but this is still and quiet : and if so be the angler catch no fish, yet he hath a wholesome walk...
Page 60 - And tear that harden'd heart from out her breast, Which, with her entrails, makes my hungry hounds a feast. * Nor lies she long, but as her fates ordain, Springs up to life, and fresh to second pain, Is saved to-day, to-morrow to be slain.
Page 312 - If a match or sweepstakes be made for any particular day in any race week, and the parties agree to change the day to any other in the same week, all bets must stand ; but if the parties agree to run the race in a different week...

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