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Deeds of dreadful note are being committed in Oxford Street, where the lessee of the PRINCESS's is mangling, in most heinous fashion, Harold's " Marie.” Before attempting opera, Mr. Maddox should contrive to engagé fit and proper aid for the purpose of effectually carrying out any laudable intentio: he may entertain of placing before the public the valued compositions of the great masters. As it is, he is not in a condition to do more than to evoke general censure for the disgraceful and contemptible manner he appears disposed to treat the works of composers of high standing in the musical world. In the present instance of “ Marie," the total incapacity of the vocal and instrumental performers is painfully apparent. The singing of the chorus is not merely bad, but it is positively vile and intolerable. The orchestra is, if possible, worse than ever; and, sooth to say, it was never above mediocrity, the discordant noises proceeding from the “ band of fierce barbarians” inspire the unfortunate auditor with feelings of unmitigated disgust and the most appalling horror.

The SURREY, after having undergone extensive alterations, is open is a richly redecorated form. Mr. Shepherd, Mr. Emery, Miss Vincent, and Mrs. Tellett are amongst the company. “The Bivouac of the Hills,” and “A Night in the Tower,” afford an opportunity for the display of the varied talents of these several performers. Judging from the liberal applause bestowed, it is not too much to say that the audience highly approve of the exertions made to contribute to their amusement. Tom Mathews is in high favour here as Clown in “ Harlequin Lord Lovel.”

The Tableaux Vivans" at the MINERVA Hall, in the Haymarket, vividly bespeak the exceeding care and attention bestowed on the grouping, by Mr. Abraham Cooper-a name familiar to those of our readers conversant with this celebrated artist's subjects in the Royal Academy

The POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTION is prolific in novelties of most amuging and scientific kind. To the Dissolving Views the directors of this admirably conducted institution have lately added the region, which thousands are desirous of being entertained with anything but a dissoloing view of California.

STATE OF THE ODDS, &o.

Although the Derby is still in the shade as a betting race, it has not been without an important feature during the last few weeks. This has been developed in a very strong feeling for or from John Scott's stable in favour of Nunny-kirk and Strongbow. It rather increases than otherwise, and any offer at or near the prices quoted is always considered acceptable. They look very like becoming the utrumque horum that have so often puzzled the Northern lights which to get on. Lord Eglinton stands next best for the month; Elthiron coming again with a very fair promise of staying, and the crack once more having a decided lead of the field. Tadmor, Honeycomb, and Co. have a very " as you were" appearance, and the business on them has been as unimportant in amount as uninteresting in its result.

With the nominations out and weights fixed, the Chester Cup has a much more "ship-shape” look than of late, and indeed has only now to be put

45

into proper marching order by the further sifting out of the acceptances : this will be effected by the first of February. In the meanwhile we have confined our report to the turn business has taken since the handicap appeared. From this estimate it will be gathered that the Irish are in good heart and hope with Blucher, Farewell, Ballinafad, and King of Kildare; John Day threatening with Cossack; Dawson ready for one pull more with the old mare Inheritress, and Newmarket by no means dissatisfied with the Colonel's filly for a champion. The hardest hits yet struck have been for Blucher and Inheritress—the horse, who showed at home in good form towards the close of last season, first favourite beyond a doubt. The number of subscribers reach to two hundred and one!-plus forty-seven over last year. If they only accept and saddle in something like the same proportion, " the charge” must be a grand one.

For the Metropolitan, Canezou and Lugar—a young one of Lord Eglinton's—have been selected as best in ; the mare being especially fancied, and, by the reading of the handicap, with very good reason. This race, too, boasts of increased support in the way of nominations sent in; so that the weeping willow of " mine host” is not all round his hat yet. Unhappy Doncaster, however, wears it, and with a very bad grace ; for her sins have long merited the neglect now experienced. THE DERBY.

Jan. 1. Jan. 8. Jan. 15. Jan. 22. Jan. 29. The Flying Dutchman

9 to 2 5 to 1 4 to 1

4 to 1 Tadmor

7 1 7.. 1 7 1 7 1 Honeycomb

13

12

12 1 Nouny-kirk..

35 1 30 1 25

20 1 Strongbow

35 to 1 30
30 1 25

20 1 Osterley

25

20 1 Uriel

25 1 Elthiron

40 1

1 40 1 40 1 2000 60 Chatterer

40
50

50 1 The Knout

40

40 1 Old Dan Tucker.

50 1 50 150 1 Indus

66 1 60 Thringarth

1 Silistria Colt

1000 15 Velveteen Colt

2000 25 Colt out of Flambeau's dam.

1000 15 Scott's lot

1

5 THE OAKS. Escalade.

1

1 Sister to Arkwright

7

1 Nina

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1 THE CHESTER Cup.—25 to 1 against Blucher, 4 years old, 7st. 8lb.; 30 to 1 against Cossack, 5 years old, 9st. 71b.; 28 to 1 against Geraldine, 6 years old, 6st. 121b. ; 25 to 1 against Inheritress, aged, 8st. 6lb.; 40 to 1 against Dacia, 4 years old, 7st. 2lb.; 40 to 1 against Ellerslie, 4 years old, 7st.; 40 to 1 against Farewell, 4 years old, 6st. 10lb.; 3000 to 60 against Ballinafad, 5 years old, 7st. 21b. ; 50 to 1 against Sylvan, 4 years old, 7st. 21b.; 40 to I against Executor, 5 years old, 7st. 121b.; 50 to 1 against Chanticleer, 6 years old, 9st. 9lb.; 50 to 1 against Do-it-again, 4 years old, 6st. 13lb.; 100 to 1 against Miss Nipper, 4 years old, 5st. 121b.; 1000 to 15 against King of Kildare, 4 years old, 7st. 4lb. ; 50 to 1 against Clermont, 5 years old, 7st. 6lb.; 1000 to 15 against Rathmines, 5 years old, 6st. 101b.; 33 to 1 against The Tartar, 5 years old, 7st. 81b.; 3000 to 60 against Peep-o'-day Boy, 5 years old, 8st. 5lb.; 1000 to 15 against Pelham, 3 years old, 5st. 5lb.; 1000 to 15 against Dulcet, aged, 7st. 101b.

THE METROPOLITAN HANDICAP.-8 to 1 against Cauezou, 4 years old, 8st. llb.; 20 to 1 against Lugar, 3 years old, 4st. 10lb. ; 15 to against Dacia, 4 years old, 6st. Illb.; 15 to

against Loup-Garou, 3 years old, 5st. 21b.; 30 to against Rowland, 3 years old, 5st. ; 30 to 1 against Executor, 5 years old, 8st. 3lb.; 33 to 1 against Maid of Lyme, 6 years old, 6st. 1llb.; 16 to 1 against Flatcatcher, 4 years old, 8st.; 16 to 1 against Backbiter, 4 years old, 6st lllb.; 18 to 1 against Clarissa, 3 years old, 4st. 9lb.; 33 to 1 against Dotheboys (late Borneo), 3 years old, 5st.

THE NORTHAMPTONSHIRE STAKES.–12 to 1 against The Cur, aged, 9st.; 20 to 1 against War Eagle, 5 years old, 8st. 13lb.

The LIVERPOOL STEEPLE Chase.–15 to 1 against Proceed, 20 to 1 against Chandler, 20 to 1 against The British Yeoman, 20 to 1 against The Iron Duke, 25 to 1 against Gamester, 25 to 1 against The Curate, 30 to 1 against Shamrock, 30 to 1 against Sir John.

..

EMBELLISHMENTS.

ST. LAWRENCE: WINNER OF THE CHESTER CUP, 1847.-ENGRAVED BY E. HACKER, FROM A PAINTING BY HARRY HALL,

OF NEWMARKET.

“ ALL BUT BAGGED." ENGRAVED BY J. WESTLEY, FROM A

PAINTING BY G. ARMFIELD.

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. 182

LANDS.”.

.

CONTENTS.

Page. DIARY FOR MARCH THE TURF.-BY CRAVEN

. 153 HINTS FOR A “CRACK" CUP HANDICAP.-BY THE DRUID . 165 COUNTRY PRACTICE.- BY GELERT

. 167 ST. LAWRENCE: WINNER OF THE CHESTER CUP, 1847.-BY CASTOR

176 "ALL BUT BAGGED.”-BY OXONIAN HUNTING, AND THE MILLION.–BY HARRY HIEOVER

. 183 SKETCHES FROM THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE.-BY THE AUTHOR OF SCENES AND SPORTS IN FOREIGN

-THE BIVOUAC

190 CAPTAIN PIASKIN's Visit TO THE BATH AND BRISTOL STEEPLE

CHASES; TOGETHER WITH SOME DETAILS OF THE NEIGH-
BOURING SPORTING QUARTERS. -BY LINTON

· 197 KNAPSACK WANDERINGS.—BY A BRITISH OFFICER

. 205 THE GUN, AND HOW TO USE IT.-BY RAMROD

. 213 SPORTING INCIDENTS AT HOME AND ABROAD (FROM THE Ms.

LIFE OF THE HON. PEROY HAMILTON).--COMMUNICATED
TO AND EDITED BY LORD WILLIAM LENNOX

217 NOTES OF THE CHASE.-BY CECIL

223 PINE ARTS.-THE BRITISH STUD: CRUCIFIX AND LANERCOST

226 PUBLIC AMUSEMENTS OF THE METROPOLIS

. 227 STATE OF THE ODDS

229

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THE TURF REGISTER, 1848:
DONCASTER-MORPETH - BRECONSHIRE-BEDFORD-LEICES-

TER

RUGELEY

MANCHESTER AUTUMN MEETING

OSWESTRY UPTON WREXHAM - NEW MARKET FIRST
OCTOBER MEETING KELSO SANDBACH CHESTER-
FIELD-HORWICH-WALSALL

129_144 M

First Quar., 2 day, at 3 min. past midnight.
Full Moon, 9 day, at 2 min. past I morning.
Last Quar., 17 day, at 39 min. past midnight.
New Moon, 24 day, at 6 min. past 2 afternoon.
First Quar., 31 day, at 58 min. past 6 morning.

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Moon's

r 6 47 6 Morning

RISES afternoon

Sun Moon High WATER M.W. OCCURRENCES.

rises and D.D.

rises & London Bridge. sets.

sets. morn. I aftern

h. m. d. / h. m. h. m. h. m. 1 T St, Dabid's Day.

6 15 6 35 2F WETHERBY STEEPLE CHASES. s

5 40 7 1 34 7 7 30 3 S'

r 643 8 2 40 8 4 8 40 45 Second Sunday in Lent. s 5 43 93 38 9 25 10 10 5 M

6 38 10 4 27 10 5311 40 6 T BIGGAR COURSING MEETING. s 5 4711 5 9'no tide o 15 7W LINCOLN STEEPLE CHASES r 6 34 12 5 43 0 44 1 10 8 T MANCHESTER RACES.

s 5 50 13 6 12 1 37 2 0 9 F

r 6 30 F

2 20 2 40 10 S

s 5 54 15 7 46 3 0 3 20 11 $ Third Sunday in Lent. ir 6 2516 8 52 3 35 3 53 12 M

s 5 27 17 9 56 4 10 4 25 13 T COVENTRY STEEPLE Chase. r 6 2018 10 59 4 45 5 0 14 W AYLESBURY STEEPLE CHASES.

s 6 119

Morning

5 15 5 35 15 T MALLENY COURSING MEETING.r 6 16 20 0 0 5 0 6 7 16 F DONCASTER STEEPLE CHASES. s 6 421 0 57 6 25 6 45 17/ s St. Patrick's Dan.

r 6 11 22 1 51 7 5 7 30 18 S Fourth Sunday in Lent. s 6 723 2 39 8 0 8 45 19 M STRATFORD-ON-Avon STEEP. C. r 6 724 3 23 9 24 10 20 T WARWICK Races. [Chase. s 6 11 25 4 2 10 4511 25 21 W Marcu (CAMBRIDGESHIRE) St. r 6 226 4 37 notide at noon 22 T GRAND MILITARY S. C. AT LEA-S 6 1427 5 8 0 30 0 55 23 F Aylsham (Norf.) Fair. [MINGTON r 5 58 28 5 36 1 15 1 35 24 S Loughborough Fair.

1 55 2 15 253 Fifth Sunday in Lent, r 5 53 1 7 35 2 33 2 50 26 M LEAMINGTON ANNUAL ST. Ch.s 6 21 2 8 53 3 10 3 30 27 T NORTHAMPTON RACES.

1 5 49 310 11 3 40 4 10 28 W Chipping Norton Fair.

s 6 24 411 25 4 30 4 50 29 T CROXTON PARK Races. [ends. r 5 54 5 1 5 13 5 35 30 F LANARK S. C. Cambridge Terms 6 27 6 0 34 5 57 6 20 31 S Ragland F. Oxford Term ends. r 5 39 71 1 34 6 50 7 40

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afternoon

Morning

ton ..

RACES IN MARCH. Granard (Ireland)

8 Grand Military, at LeamingManchester Spring 8 Penbrokeshire

8

..24 & 23 Kipling Coates...

15 Coventry
13 & 14 Leamington Annual

20 Warwick Spring 20 Aylesbury

14 Carlile and Cumberland 29 Northampton ...... 27 Ormskirk 14 Bury St. Edınunds

29 Croxton Park 29 Doncaster 16 Lanark

31) STEEPLE CHASESIN MARCH Roscommon (Ireland) 17 COURSING MEETINGS IN Harpenden 2 Stratford on Avon ........ 19

MARCH. Wetherby 2 Hednesford ... 19 Belsay

2 Fermanagh (Ireland) 6 Emo Hunt (Ireland).... 20 & 21 Biygar.......

....... 6, 7 & 8 Lincoln ..... 7 March 21 Trentham

S Moreton in Marsh 8 Edgeware

22 Malleny... .....15, 16 & 17 Manchester 8 West of Scotland

22 Ridgway (Lytham) ....16 & 17 Brough (Catterick) and Licester not fixed.

THE TURF.

BY CRAVEN.

" If it do come to pass

That any man turn ass,
Leaving his wealth and ease,

A stubborn will to please,
Ducdàme, ducdame, ducdame :

Here shall he see,
Gross fools as he,
An if he will come to me."

-As You Like It.

In the last number of this periodical there appeared a paper, of which the subject was, “ Tattersall's, as it was and as it is.” It was the narrative of one, if I mistake not, who might have prefaced his confessions as Æneas opened the detail of his adventures to the Queen of Carthage.

Si tantus amor casus cognoscere nostros,
Quanquam animus meminisse horret, luctuque refugit,

Incipiam........ The polished surface of high civilization and modern refinement covers many a shoal and quicksand, of which the chart of your philosophy makes no note. Thus the essay alluded to, while it sets out the list of professionals who did, and do, occupy their business in the ring, says nothing of the hosts of amateurs that fretted their hour upon its event. ful stage ; played their parts in its melancholy pageant, and then were seen no more. The Leg is a moral parasite, as much the natural growth of the circumstances we find him in, as the ivy and honeysuckle of the soil in which they flourish. His presence excites our annoyance ; but it affects neither our sympathy nor surprise.

" Thou art a slave, whom Fortune's tender arm

With favour never clasp’d; but bred a dog.” As the locust to the leaf, as the leech to the vein, is the Leg to the thoughtless and the prodigal, that have the world was their confectionary.'' He is less mischievous, notwithstanding, than many who adopt the life of the social rover. He preys upon men's abundance--as the wolf on the fold-though he does not turn aside should, haply, one of the lean kine throw itself in his way. He is wily, wary, and wise--at least, until success has made him so bold as to provoke fate. . ,...

“Call me not fool till heaven hath sent me fortune." He is base ; but then his business is not gentle. The chronicler of Tattersall's thus exhibits him, pronouncing the cabala of his sect. “Go to h-1! I have got the money, and I mean to keep it." His maxim is no mystery ; those who seek him know the terms of their association.

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