The new encyclopędia; or, Universal dictionary ofarts and sciences, Volume 15

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Page 194 - I'll leave you till night; you are welcome to Elsinore. Ros. Good my lord ! [Exeunt Rosencrantz and Giiildenstern. Ham. Ay, so, God be wi' ye :—Now I am alone. O, what a rogue and 'peasant slave am I ! Is it not monstrous that this player here, But in a fiction, in a dream of passion, Could force his soul so to his own conceit That from her working all his visage wann'd ; Tears in his eyes, distraction in 's aspect, A broken voice, and his whole function suiting With forms to his conceit ? and...
Page 109 - Biron they call him ; but a merrier man, Within the limit of becoming mirth, I never spent an hour's talk withal : His eye begets occasion for his wit ; For every object that the one doth catch The other turns to a mirth-moving jest...
Page 360 - What though no friends in sable weeds appear, Grieve for an hour, perhaps, then mourn a year, And bear about the mockery of woe To midnight dances, and the public show?
Page 342 - The choice and flower of all things profitable in other books, the psalms do both more briefly contain, and more movingly also express, by reason of that poetical form wherewith they are written. The ancients, when they speak of the Book of Psalms...
Page 347 - Though his excellency mount up to the heavens, And his head reach unto the clouds ; Yet he shall perish for ever like his own dung : They which have seen him shall say, Where is he?
Page 263 - Trtat. f. fawn, it is true, but he can be civil and obliging as well as the Knave ; and furely, his Civility is more alluring, becaufe it has more Manlinefs and Grace in it than the mean Adulation of the other ; he cannot cheat or undermine, but he may be cautious, provident, watchful of Occafions, and equally prompt with the Rogue in improving them ; he fcorns to...
Page 130 - ... see where it bottoms. Those who have got this faculty, one may say, have got the true key of books, and the clue to lead them through the mizmaze of variety of opinions and authors to truth and certainty.
Page 305 - ... of the Roman law; whereas, while it remains in the hands of the mortgagor, it more resembles their hypotheca, which was, where the possession of the thing pledged remained with the debtor.
Page 225 - It is much more common to fee them dye their eyebrows and eyelaflies ; which . dye does not add to the beauty of the countenance, but confiderably to the fire of the eyes! They trace regular figures with henna, of a faffron colour, on their feet, the palm of the hand, and the tip of their fingers. On their vifiting day, they wrap themfelves in a clean fine haick, which comes over the head, and fin-rounds the face fo as to let them fee without being feen. When they travel, they wear itraw hats to...
Page 334 - Center moves on uniformly in a right Line drawn in the Plane of their circular Motion; the Sum of the Motions of the two Globes, as often as the Globes are in the right Line described by their common...

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