Recollections of Oxford

Front Cover
Macmillan, 1870 - 460 pages
 

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Contents

CHAP
1
II
27
III
33
IV
45
VI
137
VII
160
VIII
198
IX
214
XIII
257
XIV
280
XV
288
XVI
295
XVII
317
XVIII
333
XIX
349
XX
377

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Page 318 - That modes of interpretation such as are suggested in the said Tract, evading rather than explaining the sense of the Thirty-nine Articles, and reconciling subscription to them with the adoption of errors, which they were designed to counteract, defeat the object, and are inconsistent with the due observance of the above-mentioned Statutes.
Page 194 - Sir Robert was gathering snails, and throwing them over the wall into his neighbour's garden. The doctor reproached him very roughly, and stated to him that this was unmannerly and unneighbourly. 'Sir,' said Sir Robert, 'my neighbour is a Dissenter.
Page 38 - The masters take a most solemn oath, that they will examine properly and impartially. Dreadful as all this appears, there is always found to be more of appearance in it than reality ; for the greatest dunce usually gets his testimonium signed with as much ease and credit as the finest genius.
Page 203 - He would not allow much merit to Whitfield's oratory. "His popularity, sir," said he, "is chiefly owing to the peculiarity of his manner. He would be followed by crowds were he to wear a nightcap in the pulpit, or were he to preach from a tree.
Page 37 - I was examined in Hebrew and in History.' 'What is the Hebrew for the place of a skull ? ' I replied, ' Golgotha.' ' Who founded University College ? ' I stated (though, by the way, the point is sometimes doubted) ' that King Alfred founded it.'
Page 106 - Where shall we our great Professor inter, That in peace may rest his bones ? If we hew him a rocky sepulchre, He'll rise and break the stones, And examine each stratum that lies around, For he's quite in his element underground.
Page 335 - The Church of England does not teach, nor can it be proved from Scripture, that any change takes place in the elements of consecration in the Lord's Supper. 2. It is a mode of expression calculated to give erroneous views of Divine revelation, to speak of Scripture and tradition as joint authorities in the matter of Christian doctrine.
Page 273 - Muses' tribute, for he lov'd the Muse, (And when the soul the gen'rous virtues raise, A friendly Whig may chant a Tory's praise), Full many a fond expectant eye is bent Where Newark's towers are mirror'd in the Trent. Perchance ere long to shine in senates first, If manhood echo what his youth rehears'd, Soon Gladstone's brows will bloom with greener bays Than twine the chaplet of a minstrel's lays ; Nor heed, while poring o'er each graver line, The far, faint music of a lute like mine. His was no...
Page 4 - Thou dear old College ! by whatever name Natives or strangers call our ' Oxford Queen,' To me, from days long past, thou'rt aye the same,— Maudlin,—or Magdalen,—or Magdalene.
Page 216 - He was at once pronounced to be an odd fish, when he came up after some years' absence from Oxford, wearing a vulgarlooking, powdered, one-curled wig, speaking with a strong Lancashire dialect, and reading with a voice of thunder: indeed his enunciation of the oaths and exhortations on Degree-days was an awful infliction on the drum of one's ear." Full justice, too, is done to the very real intellectual life in the College. " In the Easter Public Examination of this year (1809), Brasenose College...

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