Costume in the Comedies of Aristophanes

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 27, 2015 - Art - 198 pages
This book offers an interpretation of the handling of costume in the plays of the fifth-century comic poet Aristophanes. Drawing on both textual and material evidence from the fourth- and fifth-century Greek world, it examines three layers of costume: the bodysuit worn by the actors, the characters' clothes, and the additional layering of disguise. A chapter is also devoted to the inventive costumes of the comic chorus. Going beyond describing what costumes looked like, the book focuses instead on the dynamics of costume as it is manipulated by characters in the performance of plays. The book argues that costume is used competitively, as characters handle each other's costumes and poets vie for status using costume. This argument is informed by performance studies and by analyses of gender and the body.
 

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Contents

COMIC COSTUME IN ACTION
1
THE COMIC BODY AS COSTUME
16
CLOAKS SHOES AND SOCIETAL REDRESS
59
DISGUISE GENDER AND THE POET
88
ANIMAL COSTUMES AND CHORAL SPECTACLE
110
CONCLUSION
144
Bibliography
179
Index
193
Copyright

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About the author (2015)

Gwendolyn Compton-Engle is Associate Professor of Classics at John Carroll University. She has taught at Colgate University and St Olaf College. She has published several articles on Aristophanes, including one that was awarded the Gildersleeve Prize from the American Journal of Philology in 2003.

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