The Correspondence of Charles Darwin:, Volume 5; Volumes 1851-1855

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Cambridge University Press, Feb 8, 1990 - Science - 752 pages
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The correspondence in this volume reveals the two sides of Darwin's life in a new intensity. It opens with a tragedy, the death of Darwin's oldest and best loved daughter, Anne, and goes on to show how Darwin sought relief from his loss through his work, with a single-minded but increasingly weary commitment to the completion of his cirripede monographs. In September 1854, as soon as the final proofs of the last barnacle volume had been returned to the printer, Darwin threw himself into a resumption of his species work. He followed up old ideas by initiating new experiments and establishing a worldwide correspondence that encompassed geographical distribution, variation, and plant and animal breeding. The wealth of letters through 1855 makes evident the frenzy of intellectual activity that followed Darwin's terse announcement in his diary: "Sept. 9th (1854) began sorting notes for Species Theory..." These letters are indispensable for the Darwin scholar both historically and biologically, while they provide the general reader with a fascinating look at the scientist at work.
 

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Contents

Appendixes
535
Bibliography
565
Biographical register and index to correspondents
602

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Page 598 - Geological Observations on the Volcanic Islands visited during the Voyage of HMS Beagle; together with some brief Notices on the Geology of Australia and the Cape of Good Hope; being the second part of the Geology of the Voyage of the Beagle.
Page 597 - WERNER'S NOMENCLATURE OF COLOURS. With Additions, arranged so as to render it highly useful to the Arts and Sciences, particularly Zoology, Botany, Chemistry, Mineralogy, and Morbid Anatomy. Annexed to which are Examples selected from Well-known Objects in the Animal, Vegetable, and Mineral Kingdoms.

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