Polis and Personification in Classical Athenian Art

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BRILL, Jun 22, 2011 - Art - 202 pages
In this study Dr Smith investigates the use of political personifications in the visual arts of Athens in the Classical period (480-323 BCE). Whether on objects that served primarily private roles (e.g. decorated vases) or public roles (e.g. cult statues and document stelai), these personifications represented aspects of the state of Athens—its people, government, and events—as well as the virtues (e.g. Nemesis, Peitho or Persuasion, and Eirene or Peace) that underpinned it. Athenians used the same figural language to represent other places and their peoples. This is the only study that uses personifications as a lens through which to view the intellectual and political climate of Athens in the Classical period.
 

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Contents

Viewing personifications in Classical Athens
1
Chapter Two Names or comments? The Birth of Political Personification in Greece
11
Local Personifications and Athenian Imperialism
27
Chapter Four Goddess before personification? Right and Retribution
41
Kharites virtues other nymphs in the Gardens of Aphrodite
51
Chapter Six Aristocracy or democracy? Eukleia and Eunomia between the gods
71
Aristophanes Eirene and her attendants
77
Civic festivals and other peacetime pleasures
83
The Body Politic at home and abroad
91
Eirene revisited
109
Democracy and more civic virtues in fourth century Athens
119
Chapter Twelve Conclusion
127
Catalogue
133
Indices
177
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About the author (2011)

Amy C. Smith, PhD (1997) in Classical Archaeology, Yale University, is Senior Lecturer in Classics and Curator of the Ure Museum, University of Reading. She has published widely on Graeco-Roman art in the spheres of politics, myth, and religion.

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