A World-systems Reader: New Perspectives on Gender, Urbanism, Cultures, Indigenous Peoples, and Ecology

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Thomas D. Hall
Rowman & Littlefield, 2000 - Social Science - 339 pages
This book brings together some of the most influential research from the world-systems perspective. The authors survey and analyze new and emerging topics from a wide range of disciplinary perspectives, from political science to archaeology. Each analytical essay is written in accessible language so that the volume serves as a lucid introduction both to the tradition of world-systems thought and the new debates that are sparking further research today. Visit our website for sample chapters!
 

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Contents

WorldSystems Analysis A Small Sample from a Large Universe
3
Recent Research on WorldSystems
29
From Many Disciplines
57
Archaeology and WorldSystems Theory
59
Geography Place and WorldSystems Analysis
69
KWaves Leadership Cycles and Global War A Nonhyphenated Approach to World Systems Analysis
83
Gender and the WorldSystem Engaging the Feminist Literature on Development
105
WorldSystems Overviews
129
Women at Risk Capitalist Incorporation and Community Transformation on the Cherokee Frontier
195
Resistance through Healing among American Indian Women
211
Frontiers Ethnogenesis and World Systems Rethinking the Theories
237
Modern East Asia in WorldSystems Analysis
271
Future Visions
287
From State Socialism to Global Democracy The Transnational Politics of the Modern WorldSystem
289
WorldSystem and Ecosystem
307
PoliticalEconomy of the WorldSystem Annuals
323

Canadas Linguistic and Ethnic Dynamics in an Evolving WorldSystem
131
Urbanization in the WorldSystem A Retrospective and Prospective
143
WorldSystems Theory in the Context of Systems Theory An Overview
169
Postmodernism Explained
181
Gender Urbanism Cultures Indigenous Peoples and Ecology
193

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About the author (2000)

Thomas D. Hall is currently the Lester M. Jones Professor of Sociology and Anthropology at DePauw University.

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