THE NATURALIST; A POPULAR MONTHLY MAGAZINE. VOL. VII.

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Page 34 - Fear and trembling Hope, Silence and Foresight; Death the Skeleton And Time the Shadow ; — there to celebrate, As in a natural temple scattered o'er With altars undisturbed of mossy stone, United worship ; or in mute repose To lie, and listen to the mountain flood Murmuring from Glaramara's inmost caves.
Page 195 - There's a daisy; I would give you some violets, but they withered all when my father died.
Page 12 - Its thunder-splintered pinnacle; Round many an insulated mass, The native bulwarks of the pass, Huge as the tower which builders vain Presumptuous piled on Shinar's plain. The rocky summits, split and rent, Formed turret, dome, or battlement, Or seemed fantastically set With cupola or minaret, Wild crests as pagod ever decked, Or mosque of Eastern architect.
Page 64 - ... justice, he bade each of them call the dog ; which, when they did, the dog went presently to the beggar, forsaking my Lady. When he saw this, he bade my Lady be contented, for it was none of hers ; yet she, repining at the sentence of my Lord Chancellor, agreed with the beggar, and gave her a piece of gold, which would well have bought three dogs, and so all parties were agreed ; every one smiling to see his manner of inquiring out the truth.
Page 216 - ... of bulls, the fur of bears. Made for his use all creatures if he call, Say what their use, had he the...
Page 79 - For over all there hung a cloud of fear, A sense of mystery the spirit daunted, And said, as plain as whisper in the ear, The place is Haunted ! PART III.
Page 195 - The ousel-cock, so black of hue, With orange-tawny bill, The throstle with his note so true, The wren with little quill. "The finch, the sparrow, and the lark, The plain-song cuckoo gray, Whose note full many a man doth mark. And dares not answer nay.
Page 82 - That eagle's fate and mine are one, Which, on the shaft that made him die, Espied a feather of his own, Wherewith he wont to soar so high.
Page 198 - Tis sweet to hear the watch-dog's honest bark Bay deep-mouthed welcome as we draw near home; 'Tis sweet to know there is an eye will mark Our coming, and look brighter when we come.
Page 68 - Can you explain this omen? Phys. A rainbow can only occur when the clouds containing or depositing the rain are opposite to the sun — and in the evening the rainbow is in the east, and in the morning in the west; and as our heavy rains, in this climate, are usually brought by the westerly...

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