An Essay Upon Study: Wherein Directions are Given for the Due Conduct Thereof, and the Collection of a Library, Proper for the Purpose, Consisting of the Choicest Books in All the Several Parts of Learning

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Arthur Bettesworth, 1731 - Best books - 350 pages
 

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Page 100 - I have mentioned mathematics as a way to settle in the mind a habit of reasoning closely and in train; not that I think it necessary that all men should be deep mathematicians, but that, having got the way of reasoning, which that study necessarily brings the mind to, they might be able to transfer it to other parts of knowledge, as they shall have occasion.
Page 110 - ... loose matter floating in our brain. The memory may be stored, but the judgment is little better, and the stock of knowledge not increased by being able to repeat what others have said or produce the arguments we have found in them.
Page 111 - ... cases, see where it bottoms. Those who have got this faculty, one may say, have got the true key of books, and the clue to lead them through the mizmaze of variety of opinions and authors to truth and certainty.
Page 100 - ... reasoning, which that study necessarily brings the mind to, they might be able to transfer it .to other parts of knowledge, as they shall have occasion. For, in all sorts of reasoning, every single argument should be managed as a mathematical demonstration : the connexion and dependence of ideas should be followed, till the mind is brought to the source on which it bottoms, and observes the coherence all along, though in proofs of probability one such train is not enough to settle the judgment,...
Page 99 - ... this better than mathematics, which therefore I think should be taught all those who have the time and opportunity, not so much to make them mathematicians as to make them reasonable creatures; for though we all call ourselves so, because we are born to it if we please, yet we may truly say nature gives us but the seeds of it; we are born to be, if we please, rational creatures, but it is use and exercise only that makes us so, and we are indeed so no farther than industry and application has...
Page 35 - ... such a Tincture from a Familiarity with that Object, that everything else, how remote soever, will be brought under the same View. A Metaphysician will bring Plowing and Gardening immediately to abstract notions. The History of Nature will signify nothing to him. An Alchymist, on the contrary, shall reduce Divinity to the Maxims of the Laboratory, explain Morality by Sal Sulphur and Mercury, and allegorise the Scripture itself, and the sacred Mysteries thereof, into the Philosopher's Stone. And...
Page 34 - Evil very commonly to be observed in those who have been reasoned only by one Part of Knowledge. Let a Man be given to the Contemplation of one Sort of Knowledge and that will become everything. The Mind will take such a Tincture from a Familiarity with that Object, that everything else, how remote soever, will be brought under the same View. A Metaphysician will bring Plowing and Gardening immediately to abstract notions. The History of Nature will signify nothing to him.
Page 5 - ... $1,162 for binding, this last being in addition to the salary of and the supplies for the Company's own binder-repairer in the Library. WILLIAM LOGAN Fox, Treasurer REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN Study, so far as it signifies any thing valuable or commendable, is the Pursuit of useful Knowledge, in a close Application of the Mind to Reading or Thinking, in order to the due Conduct or Entertainment of Life. And this Pursuit, so far as it regards the Conduct of Life, is certainly one of the greatest and...
Page 334 - PhyIko-Theology ; or, A Demonftration of the Being and Attributes of God from his Works of Creation : with large Notes, and many curious Obfervations,
Page 333 - The Religious Philofopher : Or, the right Ufe of Contemplating the Works of the Creator.

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