Family Forms in Historic Europe

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Mar 10, 1983 - History - 606 pages
The family forms of historic Europe have been fascinating in their variety. Their importance for the historical development of our continent would be difficult to exaggerate; for our relationship with the peoples of the other continents of the world as well. This book is an attempt to recover the different familial systems and compare them with one another. The studies range from Russia, Poland, Hungary and Austria to Scandinavia, Flanders and Britain. All the influences which have affected the character and composition of European households are taken into account. The analysis covers their function as productive work groups, in the procreation and bringing up of children, and in the support of the elderly, and their relationship with the wider society and its norms along with its political organization, central and local. Claims that inheritance customs and inheritance practice and the occupation of the household head exerted a powerful influence on the size and composition of households are subjected to rigorous and systematic investigation.
 

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Contents

Two kinds of preindustrial household formation system
65
the peasants greatest wealth serf
105
The peasant family as an economic unit in the Polish feudal
153
The familial contexts of early childhood in Baltic serf society
167
Estonian households in the seventeenth and eighteenth
207
Family and familia in earlymedieval Bavaria
217
The property and kin relationships of retired farmers
249
Preindustrial household structure in Hungary
281
Austrian household structure
347
Does owning real property influence the form of the house
379
the case of Lampernisse West
409
demographic and economic change in Eng
493
areas
513
References
532
Index
566
Copyright

theoretical
309

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