Feats on the Fiord

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Routledge, 1865
 

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Page 6 - ... waters so clearly that the fisherman, as he unmoors his boat for his evening task, feels as if he were about to shoot forth his vessel into another heaven, and to cleave his way among the stars. Still as everything is to the eye, sometimes for a hundred miles together along these deep sea-valleys, there is rarely silence. The ear is kept awake by a thousand voices. In the summer, there are cataracts leaping from ledge to ledge of the rocks ; and there is the bleating of the kids that browse there,...
Page 221 - Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night; Nor for the arrow that flieth by day; Nor for the pestilence that walketh in darkness; Nor for the destruction that wasteth at noonday.
Page 74 - Civilians ; and, as it is called, "took their opinion," showing to some of them the amount of his nephew's debts, which he had dotted down on the back of a card, and asking what was to be done, and whether such debts were not monstrous, preposterous ? What was to be done ? — There was nothing for it but to pay.
Page 6 - There, the planets cast a faint shadow, as the young moon does with us : and these planets, and the constellations of the sky, as they silently glide over from peak to peak of these rocky passes, are imaged on the waters so...
Page 6 - ... of sea-birds which inhabit the islets ; and all these sounds are mingled and multiplied by the strong echoes, till they become a din as loud as that of a city. Even at night, when the flocks are in the fold, and the birds at roost, and the echoes themselves seem to be asleep, there is occasionally a sweet music heard, too soft for even the listening ear to catch by day.
Page 7 - ... the sounds that belong to it. Thence, in winter nights, come music and laughter, and the tread of dancers, and the hum of many voices. The Norwegians are a social and hospitable people ; and they hold their gay meetings, in defiance of their arctic climate, through every season of the year.
Page 224 - Casper. By Miss Wetherell. The Brave Boy ; or, Christian Heroism. Magdalene and Raphael. The Story of a Mouse. By Mrs. Perring. Our Charlie. By Mrs. Stowe.
Page 224 - Ben Howard ; or, Truth and Honesty. By C. Adams. Bessie and Tom : A Book for Boys and Girls. Beechnut : A Franconian Story. By Jacob Abbott. Wallace : A Franconian Story. By Jacob Abbott.
Page 7 - Nor is this all. Wherever there is a nook between the rocks on the shore, where a man may build a house, and clear a field or two ; — wherever there is a platform beside the cataract where the sawyer may plant his mill, and make a path from it to join some great road, there is a human habitation, and the sounds that belong to it.
Page 5 - ... the land, and the land pushing itself out into the sea, till it ends in their dividing the region between them. On the spot, however, this coast is very sublime. The long straggling promontories are mountainous, towering ridges of rock, springing up in precipices from the water ; while the...

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