Notes and emendations to the text of Shakespeare's plays, from early manuscript corrections in a copy of the folio, 1632

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Page 401 - You say, you are a better soldier : Let it appear so ; make your vaunting true, And it shall please me well: For mine own part, I shall be glad to learn of noble men. Cas. You wrong me every way ; you wrong me, Brutus; I said an elder soldier, not a better : Did I say better ? Bru.
Page 171 - If music be the food of love, play on, Give me excess of it ; that, surfeiting, The appetite may sicken, and so die. That strain again ; — it had a dying fall : O, it came o'er my ear like the sweet south, That breathes upon a bank of violets, Stealing, and giving odour.
Page 424 - I am myself indifferent honest; but yet I could accuse me of such things that it were better my mother had not borne me. I am very proud, revengeful, ambitious; with more offences at my beck than I have thoughts to put them in, imagination to give them shape, or time to act them in.
Page 415 - Will cheer me ever, or disseat me now. I have liv'd long enough : my way of life Is fall'n into the sear , the yellow leaf; And that which should accompany old age , As honour, love, obedience, troops of friends, I must not look to have ; but , in their stead , Curses, not loud, but deep, mouth-honour, breath, Which the poor heart would fain deny , and dare not.
Page 257 - A made a finer end, and went away, an it had been any christom child; 'a parted even just between twelve and one, even at the turning o' the tide: for after I saw him fumble with the sheets, and play with flowers, and smile upon his fingers...
Page 446 - I'd use them so That heaven's vault should crack. — She's gone for ever ! — I know when one is dead, and when one lives ; She's dead as earth. — Lend me a looking-glass ; If that her breath will mist or stain the stone, Why, then she lives.
Page 137 - It is to be all made of fantasy. All made of passion, and all made of wishes ; All adoration, duty and observance All humbleness, all patience and impatience All purity, all trial, all observance:— And so am I for Phebe.
Page 101 - The cowslips tall her pensioners be; In their gold coats spots you see; Those be rubies, fairy favours, In those freckles live their savours.
Page xix - Like the poor cat i' the adage? MACB. Prithee, peace. I dare do all that may become a man; Who dares do more is none. LADY M. What beast was't, then, That made you break this enterprise to me? When you durst do it, then you were a man; And, to be more than what you were, you would Be so much more the man. Nor time nor place Did then adhere, and yet you would make both. They have made themselves, and that their fitness now Does unmake you.
Page 2 - With those that I saw suffer : a brave vessel, Who had, no doubt, some noble creature in her, Dash'd all to pieces. O, the cry did knock Against my very heart. Poor souls, they perish'd.

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