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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - EadieB - LibraryThing

Book Description She was Antoinette Cosway, a beautiful heiress grown up amid the violence and intrigue of a lush Caribbean island, and haunted by memories of a terror-ridden past. He was Rochester, a ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - CurrerBell - LibraryThing

I'd actually rate Wide Sargasso Sea as probably 4½**** but I'm rating this particular edition (Norton Critical) a bit lower because its supplementary materials, although interesting and useful, are written a bit too much in "acadamese." Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - skwoodiwis - LibraryThing

Wide Sargasso Sea By Jean Rhys Several times I’ve come close to reading this short novel – and several times my courage left me. I love Jane Eyre – adore the novel and must say here – Jane Eyre is my ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Sorrel - LibraryThing

I’ve been meaning to read Wide Sargasso Sea for a while now, as Jane Eyre is one of my all-time favourites. This is not because I necessarily approve of the characters’ decisions (and I do think the ... Read full review

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excellent book, very interesting to read.
Arti

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

If I were being generous I would say that Jean Rhys has some interesting and complex themes of race and identity in post-colonial Jamaica that she could have developed into an intriguing novel if she had invented her own plot and characters.
If were being ungenerous I would say Rhys has an axe to grind and cares little for the details or nature of the plot and the characters she has hijacked to sharpen it on. She has focused in on a plot detail of the great classic Jane Eyre, seized upon it, flipped out over it and projected her own issues and post-colonial considerations onto it. This tunnel visioned reaction she has taken and blown up into a 200 page often incoherent rant designed to illustrate...something. That Creole women are singularly put upon, victimized and deliberately driven mad by the cruel and chaotic forces of evil white colonialists and surly black freed slaves? That the fecund forces of tropical nature are maddening? That an obscure modernist writer can shoot to fame by stealing characters and themes from a great novel without creating a whole greater than the sum of its parts?
This novel has launched a thousand forums on "the racism of the Bronte sisters" and other absolute rubbish. It's one thing that some people actually get something out of it literarily, but it's being used as tool in the politicization of literature and that is something I cannot forgive.
 

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Amazing! It complements the novel Jane Eyre so well. You really understand the life story of the woman in the attic and how she became who she is in Jane Eyre. Hauntingly beautiful. 5 stars. I loved it.

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

I hate this book. To sum it up in a few words, it was written by someone trying to get attention by rewriting a classic, and trying to make a bad guy out of Mr. Rochester.

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Having read Jane Eyre prior to read this book made it a much better read. I don't think it would be as good and i don't think people would understand it if they didn't read Jane Eyre. With that said I found the book very interesting because i could compare Rhys view of Rochester and Bertha's relationship to what I had imagined in my head. I think she stayed true to Jane Eyre and did the book justice.  

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AnnB2013 - LibraryThing

Very pre-feminist in its look at the mad woman in the attic. Nice and short too. Have i said I like short? Read full review


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