Letters of Lady Rachel Russell: From the Manuscript in the Library at Woburn Abbey : to which are Prefixed, an Introduction, Vindicating the Character of Lord Russell Against Sir John Dalrymple, &c. : and the Trial of Lord William Russell for High Treason, Extracted from the State Trials

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J. M'Creery, 1809 - Great Britain - 351 pages

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Contents

Doctor Fitzwilliam to Lady Russell
12
Doctor Burnet to Lady Russell
16
Lady Russell to Dr Fitzwilliam
19
The same to the same
22
The same to the same
25
Doctor Fitzwilliam to Lady Russell
28
Doctor Simon Patrick to Lady Russell
33
Lady Russell to Dr Fitzwilliam
37
The same to the same
42
Doctor Fitzwilliam to Lady Russell
44
Lady Russell to Dr Fitzwilliam
48
The same to the same
52
The same to the same
54
The same to the same
56
The same to the same
58
The same to the same
59
The same to the same
62
The same to the same
67
The same to the same
73
Doctor Fitzwilliam to Lady Russell
74
Lady Russell to Dr Fitzwilliam
77
The same to the same
81
Doctor Tillotson to Lady Russell
83
Lady Russell to Dr Fitzwilliam
85
The same to the same
88
Lady Russell to the Earl of Strafford
90
The same to the same i
91
The same to the ne
93
The same to the same
96
The Bishop of Salisbury to Lady Russell
100
LETTER Page 36 Lady Russell to Dr Fitzwilliam
101
The same to the same
103
Dean Tillotson to Lady Russell
106
Doctor Fitzwilliam to Lady Russell
107
Lady Russell to Dr Fitzwilliam
109
The same to the same
110
Dean Tillotson to Lady Russell
112
The same to the same
113
The same to the same
115
The same to the same
118
The same to the same
120
The same to the same
125
The same to the same
127
The same to the same
129
The same to the same
130
The Princess of Orange to Lady Russell
132
Lady Russell to Dr Fitzwilliam
134
The same to the same
136
The same to the same
138
The same to the same
143
The same to the same
144
The same to the same
161
The same to the same
163
The same to the same
165
Lady Russell to Lady Alington
168
Dr Tillotson to Lady Russell
169
Lady Russell to Lord Cavendish
173
Lady Russell to Dr Fitzwilliam
174
The same to the same
175
Lady Russell to Lord Cavendish
177
Lady Russell to Dr Fitzwilliam
179
Lady Russell to Lady Alington
180
Lady Russell to Dr Fitzwilliam
181
Lady Russell to the Earl of Strafford
183
Lady Russell to Lady Clinton
184
Lady Russell to Dr Fitzwilliam
185
The same to the same
186
Lady Russell to supposed Dr Burnet
188
Lady Russell to
189
Lady Russell to supposed Dr Fitzwilliam
190
Lady Russell to supposed the Bishop of Salisbury
273
Archbishop Tillotson to Lady Russell
280
Lady Russell to Lady supposed Alington
289
The same to Lady Darby
295
LETTER Page 130 Lady Russell to Dr Fitzwilliam
296
The same to the same
297
The same to the same
299
The same to Lady Russell
301
The same to Lady Sunderland
302
The same to Dr Fitzwilliain
304
Queen Mary to Lady Russell
307
Lady Russell to Dr Fitzwilliam
308
Lady Rutland to Lady Russell
309
Lady Russell to Dr Fitzwilliam
310
Sir James Forbes to Lady Russell
312
Archbishop Tillotson to the same
314
Lady Russell to Dr Fitzwilliam
315
Archbishop Tillotson to Lady Russell
317
Lady Russell to Dr Fitzwilliam
320
The same to the same
322
The Bishop of Salisbury to Lady Russell
323
Lady Russell to Sir Robert Worsley
325
The same to King William
328
The same to Rouvigny Earl of Galway
330
The same to the same
331
The same to the same
334
The same to the same
338
The same to the same
339
The same to the same
341
Bishop of Litchfield and Coventry to Lady Russell
343
Lady Russell to the Earl of Galway
346
The same to the same
347

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Page lxxxi - Queen, or of their eldest son and heir; or if a man do violate the King's companion, or the King's eldest daughter unmarried, or the wife of the King's eldest son and heir; or if a man do levy war against our lord the King in his realm, or be adherent to the King's enemies in his realm, giving to them aid and comfort in the realm, or elsewhere, and thereof be provably attainted of open deed by the people of their condition.
Page 90 - I can say, unless thy law had been my delight, I should have perished in my trouble. The rising from the dead is a glorious contemplation, doctor ! nothing raises a drooping spirit like it...
Page lxxxi - ... if a man do violate the king's companion, or the king's eldest daughter unmarried ; or the wife of the king's eldest son and heir...
Page 14 - I look not at the things which are seen, but at those which are not seen, expecting that day which will settle and compose all my tumultuous thoughts in perpetual peace and quiet — but am undone, irrecoverably so, as to my temporal longings and concerns.
Page cix - That you, and each of you, shall be taken from the bar, and conveyed to the place from whence you came, and from thence be drawn...
Page 11 - Being appointed to preach the sermon on the Gunpowder Plot, (1684,) at the Rolls Chapel, I took for my text, ' Save me from the lion's mouth ; thou hast heard me from the horns of the unicorn.
Page 208 - And be it hereby declared, that by the undoubted and fundamental laws of this kingdom, neither the Peers of this realm, nor the Commons, nor both together in Parliament or out of Parliament, nor the People collectively or representatively, nor any other Persons whatsoever, ever had, have, hath, or ought to have, any coercive power over the persons of the Kings of this realm.
Page lxxx - Item, whereas divers opinions have been before this time in what case treason shall be said, and in what not; the King, at the request of the lords and of the commons, hath made a declaration in the manner as hereafter followeth, that is to say...
Page 7 - I have writ nothing in this that will displease Your Majesty. If I have, I humbly beg of you to consider it as coming from a woman amazed with grief; and that you will pardon the daughter of a person who served Your Majesty's father in his greatest extremities, [and Your Majesty...
Page cxi - The spectators, at these words, turned their eyes, and beheld the daughter of the virtuous Southampton rising up to assist her lord in this his utmost distress: a thrill of anguish ran through the assembly. After his condemnation, she threw herself at the king's feet, and pleaded, but alas!

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