The Sense of Beauty

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., Jun 1, 2004 - Philosophy - 288 pages
George Santayana, poet, philosopher, and literary and cultural critic, was one of the key figures in classical western philosophy. He was a man before his time . . . before the popularization of naturalism, multiculturalism, philosophy as literature, and spirituality without being a religious believer. "The Sense of Beauty" is a primary source for the study of aesthetics. Critics have described it as a milestone in aesthetic theory. Santayana's writings are thematically full of the relationships between literature, art, religion, and philosophy.

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Contents

Introduction The Methods of JIsthbtics 113
1
Part H The Materials of Beauty
53
Sound
68
Colour
72
Part IT Expbbsuojt
73
Materials surveyed
76
Form
77
There is a beauty of form
82
Example of landscape
138
Further dangers of tadeterminateaess
142
The illusion of infinite perfection
151
Organised nature the source of appercep tive forms
152
Utility the principle of organization in nature
155
The relation of utility to beauty
157
Utility the principle of organization in the arte
160
Form and adventitious oraamant
168

Physiology of the perception of form
86
Values of geometrical figures
88
Symmetry
91
Form the unity of a manifold
100
Example of the stars
103
Defects of pure multiplicity
106
Esthetics of democracy
110
Values of types and values of examples
112
Origin of types
116
The average modified in the direction of pleasure
121
Are all things beautiful?
126
Effects of indeterminate form
131
Form in words
192
The associative process
198
JEsthetic value in the second term
205
153 Cost as an element of effect
211
The authority of morals over satieties
218
Influence of the first term in the pleasing
228
The liberation of self
238
The comic
245
63 Humour
253
The stability of the ideal
263
Iwmsx 271278
271
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Page 51 - ... deem For that sweet odour which doth in it live. The canker-blooms have full as deep a dye As the perfumed tincture of the roses, Hang on such thorns and play as wantonly When summer's breath their masked buds discloses : But, for their virtue only is their show, They live unwoo'd and unrespected fade, Die to themselves. Sweet roses do not so ; Of their sweet deaths are sweetest odours made : And so of you, beauteous and lovely youth, When that shall fade, my verse distils your truth.
Page 51 - The rose looks fair, but fairer we it deem For that sweet odour which doth in it live. The canker-blooms have full as deep a dye As the perfumed tincture of the roses, Hang on such thorns, and play as wantonly When summer's breath their masked buds discloses: But, for their virtue only is their show, They live unwoo'd and unrespected fade; Die to themselves. Sweet roses do not so; Of their sweet deaths are sweetest odours made...
Page 41 - It is unmeaning to say that what is beautiful to one man ought to be beautiful to another. If their senses are the same, their associations and dispositions similar, then the same thing will certainly be beautiful to both. If their natures are different, the form which to one will be entrancing will...
Page 81 - The beauty of material is thus the groundwork of all higher beauty, both in the object, whose form and meaning have to be lodged in something sensible, and in the mind, where sensuous ideas, being the first to emerge, are the first that can arouse delight.
Page 42 - ... associations and dispositions similar, then the same thing will certainly be beautiful to both. If their natures are different, the form which to one will be entrancing will be to another even invisible, because his classifications and discriminations in perception will be different, and he may see a hideous detached fragment or a shapeless aggregate of things, in what to another is a perfect whole — so entirely are the unities of objects unities of function and use. It is absurd to say that...
Page 267 - Beauty as we feel it is something indescribable: what it is or what it means can never be said. By appealing to experiment and memory we can show that this feeling varies as certain things vary in the objective conditions; that it varies with the frequency, for instance, with which a form has been presented, or with the associates which that form has had in the past.
Page 49 - The definition of beauty. We have now reached our definition of beauty, which, in the terms of our successive analysis and narrowing of the conception, is value positive, intrinsic, and objectified. Or, in less technical language, Beauty is pleasure regarded as the quality of a thing.
Page 43 - Nothing has less to do with the real merit of a work of imagination than the capacity of all men to appreciate it; the true test is the degree and kind of satisfaction it can give to him who appreciates it most.
Page 18 - ... be noted, its relations would be observed, its recurrence might even be expected ; but all this would happen without a shadow of desire, of pleasure, or of regret. No event would be repulsive, no situation terrible. We might, in a word, have a world of idea without a world of will. In this case, as completely as if consciousness were absent altogether, all value and excellence would be gone. So that for the existence of good in any form it is not merely consciousness but emotional consciousness...

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