Machiavellian Management - A Chief Executive's Guide

Front Cover
Malcolm Coxall, Cornelio Books, Dec 10, 2012 - Philosophy - 134 pages

Based on Machiavelli's "The Prince", this modernisation describes what modern capitalists need to know to be able to get and hold onto corporate power.

Following in Machiavelli's steps, this new "chief executive's guide" leads us through all the important skills recommended in acquiring, defending and extending control over your organisation. It deals with many of the subjects which confront the modern executive every day: managing hatred, contempt, and opposition, eliminating your enemies, successful deceit, cruelty, compassion, corporate independence, opportunism, self-reliance, useful management expedients, managing managers and employees, taking and ignoring advice, using influence and the application of brutality.

The book seeks to shed some light into the darker corners of the reasoning used by the powerful "corporate princes" of our own generation, in the same way that Machiavelli attempted to enlighten the dark world of power that maintained the ruthless Borgia and Medici families in the 15th century.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

A "must read" for the budding manipulator!
But seriously... nothing changed since Machiavelli's days of savagery. Our governments and managements still operate on the basis of "the ends justify the
means".
The concept of 'morality' in business and government now is just as absent as it was in the days of the Italian mobsters of the 15th century, the Medici and Borgia families.
 

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Based on Machiavelli's "The Prince", this modernisation describes what modern capitalists need to know to be able to get and hold onto corporate power. Although the light of almost four centuries has been focused on “The Prince”, its problems are still debatable and interesting today, because they are the eternal problems between the ruled and their rulers. Such as they are, the ethics of "The Prince" are those of Machiavelli’s contemporaries. And yet these ethical standards cannot be said to be out of date.
As long as the governments and corporations in the Western world rely on material greed, rather than on moral forces to make their decisions, then Machiavelli is alive and well. This modernisation of "The Prince" seeks again to shed some light into the darker corners of the reasoning used by the powerful "corporate princes" of our own generation, in the same way that Machiavelli attempted to enlighten the dark world of power that maintained the ruthless Borgia and Medici families.
 

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4
Section 5
Section 6
Section 7
Section 8
Section 17
Section 18
Section 19
Section 20
Section 21
Section 22
Section 23
Section 24

Section 9
Section 10
Section 11
Section 12
Section 13
Section 14
Section 15
Section 16
Section 25
Section 26
Section 27
Section 28
Section 29
Section 30
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2012)

Malcolm Coxall is a management consultant, systems analyst, organic farmer and author, with more than 30 years experience working for many of the world's largest corporate and institutional organisations, starting in the field of dispute arbitration for the ILO. These experiences have provided him a ringside view of the management methodologies used by medium and large businesses in areas as diverse as banking, oil, defence, telecoms, insurance, manufacturing, mining, food, agriculture, aerospace, textiles, and heavy engineering. Malcolm has published articles on political science, sociology, human design, sustainable agriculture, organic food production, technology in organic farming, biodiversity, forest management, environmental protection and environmental economics. He is active in European environmental politics and was a successful private complainant in the European Court of Justice in several cases of national breaches of European environmental law. He now lives in Southern Spain from where he continues his IT and system consultancy work, writing and managing the family's organic olive farm.

Bibliographic information