Post-imperium: A Eurasian Story

Front Cover
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 2011 - Political Science - 279 pages

The war in Georgia. Tensions with Ukraine and other nearby countries. Moscow's bid to consolidate its "zone of privileged interests" among the Commonwealth of Independent States. These volatile situations all raise questions about the nature of and prospects forRussia's relations with its neighbors.

In this book, Carnegie scholar Dmitri Trenin argues that Moscow needs to dropthe notion of creating an exclusive power center out of the post-Soviet space. Like other former European empires, Russia will need to reinvent itself as a global player andas part of a wider community.

Trenin's vision of Russia is an open Euro-Pacific country that is savvy in its use of soft power and fully reconciled with its former borderlands and dependents. He acknowledges that this scenario may sound too optimistic but warns that the alternative is not a new version of the historic empire but instead is the ultimate marginalization of Russia.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

About the author (2011)

Dmitri Trenin is director of the Carnegie Moscow Center. From 1993 to 1997, Trenin held posts as a senior research fellow at the NATO Defense College in Rome and a senior research fellow at the Institute of Europe in Moscow. He is the author of Getting Russia Right (2007), Russia's Restless Frontier: The Chechnya Factor in Post-Soviet Russia(2004), and The End of Eurasia: Russia on the Border Between Geopoliticsand Globalization (2002), all published by Carnegie.

Bibliographic information