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tion points out the noblest ends to us and pursues the sins woner and laudable methods of obtaining them : cumtengius

als private selfish aims, and sticks at nothing which may make them succeed.

8. Discretion has large and extended views, and Ike a vellFormed eye, commands a whole horizon: anging kind of short-sightedness, that discovers the ininutest objects which

e near at hand, but is not able to discern things at a &stance. Discretion, the more it is discovered, gives a greater sat hanty

the person who possesses it: cunning, when it is ase de kted. Ioses its force, and makes a man incapable cinegios

out even those events which he might bare donc, kad be postat only for a plain man. Discretion is the perfection of res

and a guide to us in all the duties of like: cimning in instinct that only looks out after our immedate statest and

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28

4,3 ibid

24

26 t

29 9. Discretion is only found in men of strong sense anda?

* 32 derstanding : cunning is often to be met with in brutestben. lives, and in persons who are but the fewest remotes free nem. In short, cunning is only the miracol ársretint, ami

· 46 way pass upon weak men, in the same manust as tirea ften mistaken for viy and gravity for wisdom.

10. The cast of mind which is natural to 3 Üscreet 2. takes him look forward into futurity and consider what we 1d his condition milions of ages hence, as well as whe: it is at løse of aresent.

11. He knows, that the misery or happiness which are te served for him in another worid, lose nothing of their tralia , Bela s being placed at so great a distance from bim. The objects do not appear little to him because they are remote. He is siders that those pleasures and pains which liebed is etes. , ? approach nearer to him every moment, and við be presc . der, lam in their fall weigăt and measure, as muca as 12092 * ieasures, which he feels at this very instant. Fort! ). Mercier, 70

le is careful to secure to linself that whicb is
intss of his nature, and the ultimate design eít, s bi.

rries tis tirughts to the end of every ar e

distant as well as the most imtadi:
des every lule prospect an
sell her, if he does not fina n sini
pea.ttr. In a word, his topi c ,
Tus are large and glorior,

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2. Tully has therefore very justly exposed a precept deliv ered by some ancient writers, that a man should live with his enemy in such a manner as might leave him no room to become his friend ; and with his friend in such a manner, that if he became his enemy, it should not be in his power to burt him. The Brst part of this rule, which regards our behavior towards an enemy, is indeed very reasonable as well as prudential; but the latter part of it, which regards our behavior towards a friend favors more of cunning than of discretion, and would cut a man off from the greatest pleasures of life, which are the freedoms of conrersation with a bosom friend. Besides, thet when a friend is turned into an enemy, anel (as the son of Sirach calls him) a betrayer of secrets, the world is just enough to accuse the perfidiousness of the friend, rather than the indiscretion of the person who confided in him.

3. Discretion does not only shew itself in words, but in all the circumstances of action : and is like an under agent of Providence to guide and direct us in the ordinary concerns of life.

4. There are many more shining qualities in the mitics of man, but there is none so useful as discretion ; it is this indeed which gives a value to all the rest, which sets them to work in their proper timca and places, and turns them to the advalitage of the person who is possesscal of them. Withr, it learting is pedantry, and wit impertinence; virtue itsei..uuks like weakness; the best parts only qualify a man to be more sprightly in errors, and active to his own prejudice.

5. Nor does discretion only make a man the master of his own parts, but of other men's. The discreet man finds out the talents of those he converses with, and knows how to apply them to proper uses. Accordingly, if we look into particular communities and divisions of men, we nay observe, that it is the discreet niab, not the witty, nor the learned, nor the brave, who guides the conversation, and gives measures to society. A man with great talents, but void of discretion, is like Poly. themus in the fable, strong and blind, endued with an irresiste ble force, which for want of sight, is of no use to him.

6. Though a man has all other perfections, and wants discretion, he will be of no great consequence in the world, but if he has this single talent in perfection, and but a common share of others, he may do what he pleases in his station of life.

7. Althe same time that I think discretion the most useful lent a man can be master of, I look upon cunning to be the

plishment of little, inean, ingenerous ininds, Discra:

S

life: cunning is a kind mediate interestansi

a good

tion points out the noblest ends to us, and pursues th

most proper and laudable methods of obtaining them : cunni

S has only private selfish aims, and sticks at nothing which ma y

nake themi succeed. 8. Discretion has large and extended views, and like

a well. forined eye, commands a whole horizon : cunning is a 1

n de short-sightedness, that discovers the minutest objects

which are near at hand, but is not able to discern things at a d i s tan Discretion, the more it is discovered, gives a greater au t o rit to the person who possesses it: cunning, when it is O 1 Scene tected, loses its force, and makes a man incapable of about even those events which he might have done, had b e ed only for a plain man. Discretion is the perfection o son, and a guide to us in all the duties of life: cunning is of instinct that only looks out after our iminediate inter e welfare, : 9. Discretion is only found in men of strong sense a n -2 understanding : cunning is often to be met with in brutes selves, and in persons who are but the fewest l'emove s then. In short, cunning is only the mimic of discreti may pass upon weak men, in the same manner as vira ofien mistaken for wit, and gravity for wiscon.

10. The cast of mind which is natural to a discreet makes him look forward into futurity and consider wb be his condition millions of ages hence, as well as what present.

11. He knojys, that the misery or liappiness which served for him in another world, lose nothing of their by being placed at so great a distance froin bin. The a do pot appear little to him because they are remote. U siders that those pleasures and pains which lie hid in ete, approach nearer to him every moment, and will be presen t him in their full weight and measure, as much as those " and pleasures, which he feels at this very instant. For this son he is careful to secure to himself that which is the bine3, happiness of his nature, and the ultimate design of his bui :. 12. Ile carries his troughts to the end of every action, considers the most distant as well as the most im:ncciate effect of it. He supercedes every little prospect of pain and advan tage which offers itsell here, if he does not find casistent with huis views of an herealier. In a word, his hopes are full of ini, dwrtality, bis schemes are large and glorious, and his coixdur:

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suitable to one who knows his true interost, and how to pursue it by proper methods.

13. I have in this essay upon discretion, considered it both as an accomplishment and as a virtue, and have therefore described it in its fwil extent ; not only as it is conversant about Worldly affairs, but as it regards our whole existence ; not only as it is the guide of a mortal creature, but as it is in general the tirector of a reasonable being. It is in this light that discretion is represented by the wise nian, who sometimes mentions it under the name of diseretion, and sometimes under that of Wiscou.

14. It is indeed (as described in the latter part of this paper; the greatest wisdom, but at the same time in the power of evice ry one to attain. Its advantages are iniinite, but its acquisiton easy : Os', to speak of her in the words of the apocryphal writer, " Wisdomis glorious, and never sadeth away, yet seis casily seen of them that love her, and found of such as seek her.

15. " She preventeth them that desire her, in making her. self first known unto them. He that seekoth her carly shall kave no great travel: for be shall find her sitting at his doors, To think therefore upon her is perfection of wisdon, and who. 50 Watcheth for bier shall quickly be without care. For she gosib about seeking such as are worthy of her, sheweth herself lavoralie unto them in ite ways, and meeteth.them in eveo'y thought."

ON CLEANLINESS.

Shoctator, No. 65). 1. I HAD occasion to go a few niiles out of town, some days

since, in stage coach, where I had for my fellow traveller's, a dirty beau, and a pretty youn quuker woman. Having no inclination to talk mucis at that tinie, I placed iny self backward), with a design to survey them, and pick a speculation out of my two companions. Their different figures were suflicicut of themselves to draw my attention.

2. The gentleman was dressed in a suit, the ground whereof bad been black, as I perceived froni some few spaces that had

scaped the powder, which was incorporated with the greatest .:t of his coat; his pürywig, which cost no smali sum, was

fior" slovei:ly a m lier cast over his shoulders, that it seem. swt to have been coinbed since the year 1712; his jinen poich was not much concealed, was daubed with plain Spalish from the chin to the losest button, and the sianond upon his

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