LECTURES ON MODERN HISTORY

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Page 10 - Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested; that is, some books are to be read only in parts; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention.
Page 193 - I have lived long enough : my way of life Is fall'n into the sear, the yellow leaf ; And that which should accompany old age, As honour, love, obedience, troops of friends, I must not look to have ; but, in their stead, Curses, not loud but deep, mouth-honour, breath, Which the poor heart would fain deny, and dare not.
Page 80 - Their poverty extorted from their pride those charters of freedom which unlocked the fetters of the slave, secured the farm of the peasant and the shop of the artificer, and gradually restored a substance and a soul to the most numerous and useful part of the community. The conflagration which destroyed the tall and barren trees of the forest gave air and scope to the vegetation of the smaller and nutritive plants of the soil.
Page 28 - Alii immani magnitudine simulacra habent, quorum contexta viminibus membra vivis hominibus complent; quibus succensis circumventi flamma exanimantur homines.
Page iii - SMYTH'S (Professor) Lectures on Modern History; from the Irruption of the Northern Nations to the close of the American Revolution.
Page 420 - He would confirm his spirit in the truth and lead him by a right enlightened conscience ; and finding no check, but a confirmation in his conscience that it was his duty to act as he did, he upon serious debate, both privately and in his addresses to God, and in conferences with conscientious, upright, unbiassed persons, proceeded to sign the sentence against the king.
Page 370 - Lastly, for a complement of all these blessings, they were enjoyed by, and under the protection of, a king, of the most harmless disposition, and the most exemplary piety, the greatest example of sobriety, chastity, and mercy, that any prince...
Page 370 - Star-Chamber censuring the breach and disobedience to those proclamations by very great fines and imprisonment ; so that any disrespect to any acts of state, or to the persons of statesmen, was in no time more penal, and those foundations of right by which men valued their security, to the apprehension and understanding of wise men, never more in danger to be destroyed.
Page 420 - ... although he was very much confirmed in his judgment concerning the cause, yet being here called to an extraordinary action, whereof many were of several minds, he addressed himself to God by prayer, desiring the Lord, that, if through any human frailty, he were led into any error or false opinion in those great transactions, he would open his eyes, and not suffer him to proceed, but that he would confirm his...
Page 112 - And let this little hanging ball alone ; For give you but a foot of conscience there, And you, like Archimedes, toss the globe.

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