The works of Tennyson. Sch. ed, Volume 4

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Page 146 - And away she sail'd with her loss and long'd for her own ; When a wind from the lands they had ruin'd awoke from sleep, And the water began to heave and the weather to moan, And or ever that evening ended a great gale blew, And a wave like the wave that is raised by an earthquake grew, Till it smote on their hulls and their sails and their masts and their flags, And the whole sea plunged and fell on the shot-shatter'd navy of Spain, And the little Revenge herself went down by the island crags To...
Page 145 - ... came out far over the summer sea, But never a moment ceased the fight of the one and the fiftythree. Ship after ship, the whole night long, their high-built galleons came, Ship after ship, the whole night long, with her battle-thunder and flame; Ship after ship, the whole night long, drew back with her dead and her shame. For some were sunk and many were shatter'd, and so could fight us no more — God of battles, was ever a battle like this in the world before? For he said, 'Fight on! fight...
Page 167 - OUT of the deep, my child, out of the deep, From that great deep, before our world begins, Whereon the Spirit of God moves as he will— Out of the deep, my child, out of the deep, From that true world within the world we see, Whereof our world is but the bounding shore...
Page 145 - And while now the great San Philip hung above us like a cloud Whence the thunderbolt will fall Long and loud, Four galleons drew away From the Spanish fleet that day, And two upon the larboard and two upon the starboard lay, And the battle-thunder broke from them all. VIII But anon the great San Philip...
Page 175 - HALES— LONGER ENGLISH POEMS, with Notes, Philological and Explanatory, and an Introduction on the Teaching of English. Chiefly for Use in Schools. Edited by JW HALES, MA, Professor of English Literature at King's College, London.
Page 144 - THE REVENGE. A BALLAD OF THE FLEET. J. AT FLORES in the Azores Sir Richard Grenville lay, And a pinnace, like a flutter'd bird, came flying from far away : ' Spanish ships of war at sea ! we have sighted fifty-three ! ' Then sware Lord Thomas Howard : ' 'Fore God I am no coward ; But I cannot meet them here, for my ships are out of gear, And the half my men are sick. I must fly, but follow quick. We are six ships of the line ; can we fight with fifty-three?
Page 176 - EUROPEAN HISTORY. Narrated in a Series of Historical Selections from the Best Authorities. Edited and arranged by EM SEWELL and CM YONGE. First Series, 1003 — 1154.
Page 139 - They dared me to do it,' he said, and he never has told me a lie. I whipt him for robbing an orchard once when he was but a child — ' The farmer dared me to do it...
Page 146 - And the stately Spanish men to their flagship bore him then, Where they laid him by the mast, old Sir Richard caught at last, And they praised him to his face with their courtly foreign grace...

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