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" And here it may be observed, that where the general idea, to •which particular objects are referred, is very familiar to the mind, and frequently in view ; this reference, and the application of the general name, seem to be made without any apparatus... "
The Elements of Logick: In Four Books ... Design'd Particularly for Young ... - Page 208
by William Duncan - 1748 - 363 pages
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The Preceptor: Containing a General Course of Education. Wherein ..., Volume 2

Robert Dodsley - Education - 1758
...Idea, to which particular Objects are referred, is very familiar to the Mind, and frequently in view 5 this Reference, and the Application of the general...and a familiar Acquaintance with the general Idea, fuggeftina: it inftantaneoufly to the Mind. We are not however to imagine on this Account, that the...
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The preceptor: containing a general course of education [ed. by R. Dodsley].

Preceptor - 1758
...to the Mind, and frequently in view ; this Reference, and thu Application of the general Name, feern to be made without any Apparatus of Reafoning. When we fee a Horie in the Fields, or a Doa; in the Street, we readily apply tbe. Name of the Species ; Habit, and...
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Encyclopędia Britannica: Or, A Dictionary of Arts ..., Volume 10, Part 1

Colin Macfarquhar, George Gleig - Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1797
...idea, to which particular objects are referred, is very familiar to the mind, and frequently in view ; this reference, and the application of the general...When we fee a horfe in the fields, or a dog in the ftreet, we readily apply the name of the fpeciee ; habit, and a familiar acquaintance with the general...
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The Elements of Logic: In Four Books ...

Logic - 1802 - 239 pages
...application of the general name, seem to be made without any apparatus of reasoning. When we see a horse in the fields, or a dog in the street, we readily...and a familiar acquaintance with the general idea, suggesting it instantaneously to the mind. We are not, however, to imagine on this account, that the...
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The Elements of Logic: In Four Books ...

William Duncan - Logic - 1802 - 239 pages
...the general name, seem to be n:;. i!,' without any apparatus, of fe.asoiiing. When. we see a horse in the fields, or a dog in the street, we readily...and a familiar acquaintance with the general idea, suggesting it instantaneously to the mind. We are not, however, to imagine on this account, that the...
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The Elements of Logic: In Four Books ...

William Duncan - Logic - 1802 - 239 pages
...made without any apparatus of reasoning. When wa see a horse in the fields, or a dog in the street, wb readily apply the name of the. species ; habit, and a familiar acquaintance with the general idea, suggesting it instantaneously to the mind. We are not, however, to imagine on this account, that the...
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Encyclopędia Britannica: or, A dictionary of arts and sciences, compiled by ...

Encyclopaedia Britannica - 1810
...paiticular objefts are referred, is very familiar to the mind, and frequently in view ; this leference, and the application of the general name> feem to be made without any apparatus of reafoiling. When we fee a horfe in the fields, or a dog m the fireet, we readily apply the name of...
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The Elements of Logic: In Four Books ...

William Duncan - Logic - 1814 - 261 pages
...name, seem to be made without any apparatus of reasoning. When we see a horse in the fields, or a clog in the street, we readily apply the name of the species...and a familiar acquaintance with the general idea, suggesting it instantaneously to the mind. We are not, however, to imagine on this account, that the...
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Encyclopaedia Perthensis; Or Universal Dictionary of the Arts ..., Volume 13

Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1816
...propofttion, yet Jy in view ; this reference, and the application of L "" '' L " — :l *" *"" "~ thc general name, feem to be made without any apparatus...When we fee a horfe in the fields, or a dog in the ftreet, we readily apply the name of the fpecies; habit, and a familiar ac-qnaintance with the general...
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An Elementary Treatise on Logic: Comprising the Essential Principles and ...

Hezekiah G. Ufford - Logic - 1823 - 192 pages
...species be obvious or not 1 A. This will appear from particular instances : thus, when we see a horse in the fields, or a dog in the street, we readily apply to it the name of the species, or refer it to its class ; we then can as readily infer concerning it...
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