Hakluytus Posthumus, Or, Purchas His Pilgrimes: Contayning a History of the World in Sea Voyages and Lande Travells by Englishmen and Others, Issue 33

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J. MacLehose and sons, 1907 - Voyages and travels
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It's an important book. But it is rather incredible that a book, which edition is already one hundred years old, and was then a reprint of a 1625 edition, is not to be seen because of copyright issues. It shows that Google's world library project is failing.

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Page 17 - ... him from death: whereat the Emperour was contented he should live to make him hatchets, and her bells, beads, and copper; for they thought him as well of all occupations as themselves. For the King himselfe will make his owne robes, shooes, bowes, arrowes, pots; plant, hunt, or doe any thing so well as the rest.
Page 17 - Two days after, Powhatan having disguised himselfe in the most fearefullest manner he could, caused Captain Smith to be brought forth to a great house in the woods, and there upon a mat by the fire to be left alone.
Page 8 - Crudities. Hastily gobled up in five Moneths travells in France, Savoy, Italy, Rhetia, commonly called the Grisons country, Helvetia, alias Switzerland, some parts of high Germany, and the Netherlands ; Newly digested in the hungry aire of Odcombe in the County of Somerset, & now dispersed to the nourishment of the travelling Members of this Kingdome &c.
Page 17 - Towell to dry them : having feasted him after their best barbarous manner they could, a long consultation was held, but the conclusion was, two great stones were brought before Powhatan : then as many as could layd hands on him, dragged him to them, and thereon laid his head, and being ready with their clubs, to beate out his braines, Pocahontas the Kings dearest daughter, when no intreaty could prevaile, got his head in her armes, and laid her owne upon his to save him from death...
Page 16 - An? 1584. to this present 1626. With the Procedings of those Severall Colonies and the Accidents that befell them in all their Journyes and Discoveries. Also the Maps and Descriptions of all those Countryes, their Commodities, people, Government, Customes, and Religion yet knowne. Divided into sixe Bookes By Captaine lohn Smith sometymes Governour in those Countryes & Admirall of New England.
Page 17 - Pocahontas the Kings dearest daughter, when no intreaty could prevaile, got his head in her armes, and laid her owne upon his to save him from death: whereat the Emperour was contented he should live to make him hatchets, and her bells, beads, and copper...
Page 3 - Related to the World. Some left written by Mr. Hakluyt at his death, more since added, His also perused, and perfected, all examined, abbreviated, Illustrated with Notes, enlarged with Discourses, adorned with pictures, and Expressed in Mapps, in fower Parts, each containing five Bookes.
Page 15 - Surueighing of Forty eight kingdomes ancient and moderne. By WILLIAM LITHGOW WILLIAM LITHGOW was born in Lanark in 1582. In 1610 he started on the 'painefull Peregrinations ' of which he has left an account, and he states that in the course of the next nineteen years his ' paynefull feet traced over thirty-six thousand and odde miles.' In his various journeys he visited every country in Europe (except Russia), The Holy Land, Asia Minor, Egypt, Algeria and Tunis. On his third journey he was imprisoned...
Page 10 - Pinnace, and in the same Pinnace put himselfe, and his honorable son Lord William Howard, aboord the Honor de la mer, & there remained in the fight till the battell was ended. The fight was very terrible on all sides and so continued doubtfull till about one or two of the clocke in the afternoone : about which time the Philip, whom in very truth, they had all most fancie unto, began to yeelde, and give over, her men that remained alive shifting for themselves as they were able, and swimming and running...
Page 16 - Sun) as but two men or three at the most together, can in any reasonable sort march thorow them, no streete being broader commonly then I suppose Watling streete in London to be. The towne is altogether without glasse, excepting the Churches, yet with faire comely windowes, and with faire grates of Iron to them, and have very large folding leaves of wainscot, or the like.

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