Anecdotes of the Late Samuel Johnson, LL. D.: During the Last Twenty Years of His Life

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Printed for T. Cadell, 1786 - 306 pages
 

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Page 46 - Scatt'ring as thy pinions play, Liquid fragrance all the way : Is it business ? is it love ? Tell me, tell me, gentle Dove. "' Soft Anacreon's vows I bear, ' Vows to Myrtale the fair; ' Grac'd with all that charms the heart, ' Blushing nature, smiling art. ' Venus, courted by an ode, ' On the bard her Dove bestow'd.
Page 222 - On the contrary (said he), you may observe there is always something which she prefers to truth. Fielding's Amelia was the most pleasing heroine of all the romances (he said) ; but that vile broken nose never cured, ruined the sale of perhaps the only book, which being printed off betimes one morning, a new edition was called for before night.
Page 174 - Though there was much esteem however, there was I believe but little confidence between them; they conversed merely about general topics, religion and learning, of which both were undoubtedly Stupendous examples; and, with regard to true Christian perfection, I have heard Johnson say, "That George Psalmanazar's piety, penitence, and virtue exceeded almost what we read as wonderful even in the lives of saints.
Page 241 - Sir (said he), give me leave to tell something of Mr. Burke now. We were all silent, and the honest Hibernian began to relate how Mr. Burke went to see the collieries in a distant province; and he would go down into the bowels of the earth (in a bag), and he would examine every thing: he went in a bag Sir, and ventured his health and his life for knowledge; but he took care of his clothes, that they should not be spoiled, for he went down in a bag.
Page 104 - Come, come (says he gravely), let's have no sneering at what is serious to so many: hundreds of your fellow-creatures, dear Lady, turn another way, that they may not be tempted by the luxuries of PorridgeIsland to wish for gratifications they are not able to obtain: you are certainly not better than all of them; give God thanks that you are happier.
Page 126 - Mr. Murphy brought him back to us again very kindly, and from that time his visits grew more frequent, till in the year 1766 his health, which he had always complained of, grew so exceedingly bad, that he could not stir out of his room in the court he inhabited for many weeks together, I think months.
Page 307 - I do not delay a moment to declare, that, on the contrary, I have always commended it myself, and heard it commended by every one else ; and few things would give me more concern than to be thought incapable of tasting, or unwilling to testify my opinion of its excellence.
Page 67 - If the man who turnips cries, Cry not when his father dies, 'Tis a proof that he had rather Have a turnip than his father.
Page 278 - Johnson seemed to think himself neglected if the physician left him for an hour only, I made him a steady, but as I thought a very gentle harangue, in which I confirmed all that the doctor had been saying, how no present danger could be expected; but that his age and continued ill health must naturally accelerate the arrival of that hour which can be escaped by none: "And this...
Page 164 - Oft in danger, yet alive, We are come to thirty-five; Long may better years arrive, Better years than thirty-five. Could philosophers contrive Life to stop at thirty-five, Time his hours should never drive O'er the bounds of thirty-five. High to soar, and deep to dive, Nature gives at thirty-five. Ladies, stock and tend your hive, Trifle not at thirty-five; For howe'er we boast and strive, Life declines from thirty-five...

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