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O Nature, how in every charm supreme!

Whose votaries feast, on raptures ever new!
o, for the voice and fire of seraphim,
To sing thy glories with devotion due !

BEATTIE.

London:

PRINTED BY SMITH AND ELI

ENCHURCH STREET.

1817.

SLIULIGAS

THE

Envelope.

IN transmitting the enclosed to my Friend, I would recal to his recollection the circumstance, that gave it birth, and laying claim to the exercises of his friendship, and that purity of feeling, which recognizes the deed in the inclination, I would remind him of my hesitation and scruples at acquiescing in such a demand on my leisure, which to this day had continued insuperable, had my reluctance not been charged to unkindness, and my objections to a disregard of the calls of friendship.

The tie of our attachment has proved strong enough to bear a task, however disagreeable to private inclination ;pressed by so powerful a plea, what could I answer? I told my Friend of the innate difficulties in my mind, the almost insuperable barrier they presented, my unfitness for a subject, in which brevity was so necessary, and of which so superficial a knowledge could be acquired from the hasty nature of the excursion. In all these, I beheld myself anticipated. I was told the mariner when he had escaped the dangers of the storm, felt delight in recounting to his listening relatives every little occurrence. The soldier, too returned from the fatigues of a long campaign, gloried in the past scenes of bustle and occupation, whilst

seated round his family hearth. And what excuse was there for me, whose enjoyment was unalloyed.

I have therefore made the attempt, and could but a friendly glance have reached me at the moment, I should have been found in the same perplexity as is related of a noble Grecian orator, who when questioned as to his thoughtful hesitation, replied, “I am considering how I may shorten what I have occasion to speak.”

Occasi

Is there no difficulty in being concise on a subject as free and unrestricted as the air ? Or can I hope any description will prove at all satisfactory, derived from so slight an acquaintance with

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