Governing Morals: A Social History of Moral Regulation

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 13, 1999 - Law - 273 pages
This broad-ranging history of moral regulation in Britain and the United States from the late seventeenth century onward, covers specific movements such as the Society for the Reformation of Manners, the Vice Society, sexual abuse and anti-pornography movements, and self-help movements. Hunt argues that the main impetus for moral regulations often stems from the middle classes, rather than those with institutional power, but most significantly they provide classic instances of the intimate link between the "governance of others" and the "governance of the self."
 

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Contents

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LI
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Page 4 - Government" did not refer only to political structures or to the management of states; rather it designated the way in which the conduct of individuals or of groups might be directed: the government of children, of souls, of communities, of families, of the sick.
Page 16 - The Puritan wanted to work in a calling; we are forced to do so. For when asceticism was carried out of monastic cells into everyday life, and began to dominate worldly morality, it did its part in building the tremendous cosmos of the modern economic order.
Page 4 - ... were destined to act upon the possibilities of action of other people. To govern, in this sense, is to structure the possible field of action of others.

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