The Diary of the Right Hon. William Windham, 1784-1810

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Longmans, Green, and Company, 1866 - Great Britain - 540 pages
 

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Page 28 - He then proceeded to observe that I was entering upon a life which would lead me deeply into all the business of the world ; that he did not condemn civil employment, but that it was a state of great danger ; and that he had therefore one piece of advice earnestly to impress upon me — that I would set apart every seventh day for the care of my soul...
Page xii - My sons ! we have hitherto seen serene and quiet times, but now prepare yourselves for cloudy and troublesome. I command you to honour and obey our gracious sovereign, and in all times to adhere to the crown ; and though the crown should hang upon a bush, I charge you forsake it not.
Page viii - ... of a courage and determination so characteristic, as to hold him forward as the strong example of what the old English heart could effect or endure. He was such a man, that his adversary, if there was any man worthy to be his adversary, must respect him. He had, indeed, his faults, but they served like the skilful disposition of shade in works of art, to make the impression of his virtues more striking, and gave additional grandeur to the great outline of his character.
Page 17 - J. said he had never read through the ' Odyssey' completely in the original. Anecdote of his first declamation at college ; that having neglected to write it till the morning of his being to repeat it, and having only one copy, he got part of it by heart while he was walking into the hall, and the rest he supplied as well as he could extempore. Description of himself as very idle, and neglectful of his studies. His opinion, that I could not name above five of my college acquaintances who read Latin...
Page 20 - Before these were cheap places, and dear places. Now all refuges destroyed for elegant or genteel poverty. Want of such a last hope to support men in their struggle through life, however seldom it might be resorted to. Disunion of families by furnishing a market to each man's abilities, and destroying the dependence of one man on another.
Page 29 - I had no difficulty of speaking to him thus of my apprehensions ; I could not help, on the other hand, entertaining hopes; but with these I did not like to trouble him, lest he should conceive that I thought it necessary to flatter him. He answered hastily that he was sure I would not; and proceeded to make a compliment to the manliness of my mind, which, whether deserved or not, ought to be remembered that it may be deserved. I then stated that, among other neglects, was the omission of introducing,...
Page 52 - Much satisfied with myself ; and, in consequence of that satisfaction, dissatisfied rather with my adventure. Could I have foreseen that danger or apprehension would have made so little impression upon 'me, I would have insured that of which, as it was, we only gave ourselves a chance, and have deferred going till we had a wind favourable for crossing the Channel. I begin to suspect, in all cases, the effect by which fear is surmounted is more easily made than I have been apt to suppose. Certainly...
Page 175 - Let any one remember the reception and examine the language and matter of any of Francis's speeches and then say what the proportion is, on matters of this sort, between praise and merit. Francis's speeches are regular compositions, exhibiting in many parts great force of thought and conceived, throughout, in language peculiarly elegant and energetic. I know not any one whose speeches, in respect of clearness and force of diction, can stand in competition with Francis's. What I have said at any time...
Page 25 - ... mere use of those opportunities which chance is every day throwing in his way. In fact, that knowledge which it is disgraceful not to have, must from the very condition of it be easily got. How foolish, then, to neglect, much more to decline, such knowledge! yet such has been my practice all my life. In fact, I seem to have treated knowledge like commodities subjected to a duty, which can only be permitted to land at certain places regularly appointed. Thus my information goes no further than...
Page 327 - King, the country,_ and the empire, God forbid that a stone in that edifice should be picked out to gratify Lord Fitzwilliam, or anybody else. But if that kingdom, by the meditated and systematic corruption (private, personal, not politic corruption) of some, and the headlong violence and tyrannical spirit of others, totally destitute of wisdom, and the more incurably so, as not being destitute of some flashy parts, is brought into a very perilous situation...

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