Henry IV Part Two

Front Cover
Penguin UK, Apr 7, 2005 - Drama - 352 pages

'This, of the history plays, is The Tragedy ... the most lyrical Shakespeare ever wrote' Simon Schama

The old king Henry IV, sick and weary, must send out his forces - including the unruly Falstaff - to meet another rebellion that threatens to bring the country to the brink of civil war. But as the conflict grows, he must also confront a more personal problem - how to make his troublesome son Prince Hal accept his duty as heir and leave his carousing companions behind. Pitting youth against old age, son against father, carefree hope against the realities of ruling, this is an elegiac drama of pathos and regret.

Used and Recommended by the National Theatre

General Editor Stanley Wells
Edited by Peter Davison
Introduction by Adrian Poole

 

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Review: Henry IV, Part 2

User Review  - Hankrose - Goodreads

Henry IV pt. 2 picks up where the last play left off, and while great, it never quite measures up to the first installment. The (presumably) resolved dilemma of the first play returns, but there is ... Read full review

Contents

General Introduction
The Play in Performance
An Account of the Text
The Songs
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Stanley Wells is Emeritus Professor of the University of Birmingham and Chairman of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust.

Peter Davison has written or edited forty books on Orwell, Shakespeare and drama; he was appointed an OBE in 1999 and awarded the Gold Medal of the Bibliographical Society in 2003.

Adrian Poole is Reader in English & Comparative Literature and a Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. His publications include Shakespeare and the Victorians and Tragedy: Shakespeare and the Greek Example.


Stanley Wells is Emeritus Professor of the University of Birmingham and Chairman of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust.
Peter Davison has written or edited forty books on Orwell, Shakespeare and drama; he was appointed an OBE in 1999 and awarded the Gold Medal of the Bibliographical Society in 2003.
Adrian Poole is Reader in English & Comparative Literature and a Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. His publications include Shakespeare and the Victorians and Tragedy: Shakespeare and the Greek Example.

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